Alfred Hitchcock was born in London, England on April 13, 1899

Alfred Hitchcock was born in London, England on April 13, 1899

“Alfred Hitchcock” Alfred Hitchcock was born in London, England on April 13, 1899. He was the son of an East End Grocer named William and mother Emma. His father died when he was fourteen and he was raised Catholic attending a Jesuit run school for scholastic upbringing. In 1915, he secured his first job as an estimator for a telegraph and cable company. Then, in 1920 he earned his opening job within the movie industry as a title designer in a London studio. Subsequently, he worked as an assistant director, writer, and art director, until Hitchcock was offered an opportunity to direct his first film, The Pleasure Garden. His work continued over the next fifty years, influencing both film and the direction of cinematography throughout his career (Alfred Hitchcock – Filmography & Biography). Hitchcock movies were always created in a thorough manner often using storyboards with mock ups of each scene before filming. In his early career, Hitchcock directed nine silent films including The Lodger where he introduced his first cameo appearance in a movie, later becoming a trademark of Hitchcock films. He would always make his appearance in the beginning of the film so as not to deviate his viewers’ attention from the plotline. Another of Hitchcock’s preferences in films were blonde female stars, always seeking the icy look, he stated that the audience would have greater sexual interest in the character. Two of his favorite female stars were; Ingrid Bergman and Grace Kelly (Personality, Pathology, and the Act of Creation: The Case of Alfred Hitchcock). Hitchcock also often used bathrooms as a device for murders, hiding places, or lovemaking scenes. He frequently used the letters “BM” in his movies (Alfred Hitchcock – Filmography & Biography). Another common theme in Hitchcock movies involved the concept of mistaken identity. Hitchcock was the first director to openly link sex and violence and sometimes intertwine…


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