An effective way of creating an intended atmosphere, feeling or image with the use of words.

An effective way of creating an intended atmosphere, feeling or image with the use of words.

A universal technique used by both traditional and contemporary poets is that of verbal imagery; an effective way of creating an intended atmosphere, feeling or image with the use of words. In the poem “War,’ writer Mary Gilmore adopts the use of verbal imagery in order to create pictures and sensations of real experiences of war. This is present in the first stanza: “Out in the street he lies; Flies in his mouth, Ants in his eyes…’ The example used tells of a deceased soldier, stripped of his dignity and honour after being killed in battle. Gilmore also uses figurative language in order to create an influential message that war is not what it seems. This is present in the forth stanza; “The beat of the drum Was clods on the heart.’ Here, a metaphor of the beat of a drum is synchronised with the heartbeat of the poet in order to create a stressful and emotional atmosphere. This conveys to the reader the pressures faced by family members on the home front, and the hopelessness they experience at stopping their sons go into battle. The common theme of images depicting sadness and death in “War’ are a representation of the poet’s true feelings towards the situation, and add to the atmosphere of the piece. Mary Gilmore also adopts the use of several language techniques in order to convey her messages. “The crackle of hasty cheers,’ and “the flash of his eye’ are both prime examples of emotive language present in “War’. Gilmore uses such examples in order to create an atmosphere of pressure and questioned pride throughout her poems, whilst presenting a powerful and symbolic message that demands the attention of the reader. Simpler methods of description, such as the adverbs and adjectives of “ruddy and stout,’ “trampling feet’ and “hero’s death’ have also been used as a means of contributing to the importance of the piece, all whilst adding to the sense of truth, present in Gil…


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