Changing Perspectives – Maestro

Changing Perspectives – Maestro

To live without change is to not live at all. Change is an inevitable and essential part of life and as such it must be embraced in order for it to leave behind a positive imprint rather than cause destruction. All forms of texts make interpretations of changing perspectives. Through the set text Maestro, stimulus booklet text “The Door”, and the song Forty Six & 2, it can be shown that this is in fact true. In all three texts the composers utilise a variety of different language techniques to broadcast this message to us. The main text Maestro, by Peter Goldsworthy, depicts changing perspectives by the protagonist, Paul Crabbe’s, changing views on love and relationships. Paul, as represented early in the novel, begins as a stereotypical teenage male “? only interested in sex and good looking females. This is easily seen through Paul’s sexual, lustful attraction to Megan “? the most “beautiful’ girl in school. However, throughout the novel, a highly noticeable change occurs in Paul. He realises through sexual experiences with Megan who although beautiful on the surface, is very shallow, with very little to offer him. Instead, Paul finds himself in love with Rosie “? fairly well bland on the outside but someone who he can really relate to. Paul finishes in the novel having discovered the true meaning of love and having a long-term relationship with Rosie. Goldsworthy has used a variety of different language techniques to represent Paul’s changing views. Structurally, the novel is laid out in a way that establishes the fact that change is occurring. The juxtaposition of the first half of the book, which is occurring during Paul’s earlier years, with the second half of the book, which is occurring during Paul’s later years, is representative of the passage of time. This in turn shows change, as change itself occurs over time. The strong characterisation of Paul also helps us realise Paul’s changing perspective. Pau…


Comments are closed.