Conversion, as it is described in Black’s Law Dictionary, as an act of changing from one form to the other; the process of being exchanged.

Conversion, as it is described in Black’s Law Dictionary, as an act of changing from one form to the other; the process of being exchanged.

CONVERSION Conversion, as it is described in Black’s Law Dictionary, as an act of changing from one form to the other; the process of being exchanged. Giving the more narrow definition to the term, it states that in Torts, “conversion” can be defined as the wrongful possession of disposition of another’s property as if it was one’s own. Conversion is an act or a series of acts of willful interference, without lawful justification, with an item of property in a manner inconsistent with another’s right, whereby that other person is deprived of the use and possession of the property. More broad definition of conversion gives Oxford Dictionary of Law (Ed. Martin E. A. (1997). Fourth Edition; Oxford University Press). According to Oxford Dictionary of Law, conversion is the kind of Tort, that is wrongfully dealing with a person’s goods in a way that constitutes a denial owner’s wrights or an assertion of rights inconsistent with the owner’s. Wrongfully taking possession of goods, disposing of them, or refusing to give them back are acts of conversion. Mere negligence in allowing goods to be lost or destroyed is a ground for liability under the Torts Law (Interference with goods). The plaintiff in conversion must prove that he had ownership, possession or the right to immediate possession of the goods at the time of the defendant’s wrongful act. Even if defendant acted innocently it would not be considered an exception. “Trespass to chattels survives today, in other words, largely as a little brother of conversion” (Prosser and Keeton on Torts). Restatement 2d of Torts, sec. 222A defines conversion as an intentional exercise of dominion or control over a chattel which so seriously interferes with the right of another to control it that the actor may justly be required to pay the other the full value of the chattel. Important factors in determination of how serious the interference and the justice are exte…


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