Dr. Webb’s discussion of left-brain and right-brain characteristics very interesting.

Dr. Webb’s discussion of left-brain and right-brain characteristics very interesting.

I found Dr. Webb’s discussion of left-brain and right-brain characteristics very interesting. Especially when taken into account with how “gifted” children are identified. Teachers, group test scores, and grades often identify gifted children. However, many gifted children aren’t identified in school because they don’t seem to fit into the smart kid ideal. Left-brained children are more likely to be identified as gifted because they are planned and structured, solve problems logically and sequentially, and do well on multiple-choice tests. Right-brained students are fluid and spontaneous, solve problems creatively, and prefer open-ended questions. Teachers are more likely to nominate the children that pay attention in class and do well on tests and homework. Since left-brained children often seem to be daydreaming, don’t do well on certain tests, and are often disorganized and forget about their homework, they are often overlooked. Another interesting topic in the lecture was asynchronous development. Dr. Beljan explained it quite interestingly with his poker analogy. If a child was playing poker and he got a good hand, he will usually smile and give away that he has a good hand, even though his brain may be telling him to stay cool. Common skills that lag behind in development are fine motor skills meaning that the child has trouble with writing, numbers, and pencil grip, and gross motor skills which may cause the child to be clumsy, fall a lot, and do poorly in sports. Asynchronous development can also cause pressured speech, hyper sensitive reactions to stimuli, low frustration to tolerance, and an inability to execute what the mind’s eye sees. …


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