Drug Testing or Personal Freedom

Drug Testing or Personal Freedom

Drug Testing or Personal Freedom? Should school officials be allowed to perform random searches, urine testing and other tactics to prevent drug use in our schools? The answer is no because these policies invade personal freedom. The fourth amendment of the Bill of Rights protects United States Citizens from such warrant-less searches without reasonable suspicion. My junior year in high school, I had my first encounter with Mrs. Sherry H. Mrs. H. taught American History, which focused a lot on civil rights and laws. It was only an hour class and every minute was worth listening. Class discussions were very political, but that was her way of getting us ready for the real world. “Seeing things with open eyes” was one of her favorite sayings. She strongly encouraged us to stand up for what we believed in, whether it was constitutional or unconstitutional. In 1996, a random school search took place at W. F. High. Marijuana was found on school property. Though the shocking news traveled fast, nobody knew details of what was found or where it was found. Four years prior Savannah -Chatham County Board Of Education adopted a “Safe School Plan”, better known as “zero tolerance” for drugs, alcohol, and weapons. The board also followed up with a specific “Drug Free Workplace” (DFWP) for its employees. Its purpose is to “deter user and abusers of alcohol, drugs and other controlled substances”. Mrs. H.’s car was searched and marijuana was found. Mrs. H. was instructed to take a drug test within two hours of the notice. We all knew how much Mrs. H. was against drug tests and random searches. Just by the way she watch the police like a hawk, making sure we were not violate of our right. Nobody knew this was the last time we would see Mrs. H. at W. F High. She was fired after refusing to take the drug test. The school board said it was an act of insubordination refusing to take the drug test. It was hard to believe a on…


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