Evaluate the historiographical debate surrounding the issue

Evaluate the historiographical debate surrounding the issue

According to Weisel, with Germany’s defeat in World War I, the nation was left with a broken government, a severely limited military, shattered industry and transportation, and a sinking economy under the strain of war debts. Many Germans were demoralized. (2000, pg 10) The Nazi (National Socialist German Workers Party) party came to power in the late 1920s. The party, through its leader Adolf Hitler, offered to restore German its pride. Holding large rallies, Hitler spoke of Germany’s long military tradition, its national character, and its entitlement to greatness. To explain Germany’s fallen state, Hitler targeted the Jews and others whom he said were not true Germans. In 1925, Hitler had published in Mein Kampf , writing: “Today I believe that I am acting in accordance with the will of the Almighty Creator: by defending myself against the Jew, I am fighting for the work of the Lord.” Many Germans were swayed by his speech and responded enthusiastically to his ideas, and in 1933 he was appointed Fuhrer (leader) of the country. (2000, pg 10 – 11) Once in power, Hitler was able to restore Germany’s economy and it’s military. He used that progress to support his expansion efforts, unchecked by Allied countries struggling with the worldwide Great Depression. In 1938 Hitler began invading the lands around Germany. From 1933 to 1939 Hitler aimed to achieve a “social revolution” in Germany. Through his concept of volksgemeinschaft, meaning ‘people’s community,’ he hoped to transform Germany into a strong country based on traditional peasant values. The Protocols are used by the Nazis to whip up public hatred of the Jews in the 1930’s. Widespread pogroms occur in Greece, Hungary, Mexico, Poland, Rumania, and the USSR. Between 1933 and 1939, the Nazis enacted over 400 laws to define, segregate, and impoverish German Jews. German society was gradually excluding the Jews without mercy. When the Nazi party attai…


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