Exercise Options To be posted on moodle by Friday Original Essay Help

Exercise Options To be posted on moodle by Friday Original Essay Help

HR4S39 Resourcing & Talent Management Module Booklet Module Leader Tony Lewis Table of Contents Welcome. 3 Module Contact Details: 3 Module Introduction/ Overview: 4 Teaching and Learning Methods. 4 Behaviour in Classes. 4 Reading lists. 4 Attendance: 4 Readings. 5 Teaching programme: 5 Assessment: 6 Essay Requirements: 6 Essay Marking Criteria: 7 Coursework Extensions: 8 Plagiarism.. 8 Marking and Return of Marked Coursework. 8 A guide to writing assignments. 10 Layout: 10 Sentence structure and punctuation. 10 Answering an assignment 11 Quoting material 13 Referencing Harvard Style. 14 Bibliography or reference lists. 15 Welcome Welcome to the module: Resourcing and Talent Management. I hope you will find the module enjoyable and stimulating. The aim of this booklet is to provide you with detailed information about the module. There are three elements that together make up the core of the module, these are: the lecture and tutorial sessions (one lecture and one tutorial per week), assessment and assigned reading. Each of these elements is integral to your mastery of this topic and if you expect to do well in this module you should apply yourself to these. Good luck this year. Tony Module Contact Details: Module Leader Mr Anthony Lewis Room: H117 Telephone: 01443 482752 Fax: Email: [email protected] For Further Info, please refer to Staff Information section within the module on Bb. Module Introduction/ Overview: Module Delivery: 8 x (approx) 5 hr Lectures/Seminars/Activity workshops. Module Overview: A major and fundamental objective of the human resources (HR) function is the mobilisation of a workforce. Organisations can only function if they are able to assemble together teams of people with the necessary skills, attitudes and experience to meet their objectives. A further objective is then to retain effective performers for as long as possible. From time to time it is also necessary to dismiss people from organisations. This module focuses on these activities, focusing not just on the practical aspects of recruitment, selection, employee retention and dismissal, but also on the strategic aspects to equip learners with the knowledge and skills required for resourcing and talent management within a global context, including : The development of a strategic approach to the attraction and retention of staff, analysing their key employment markets and gaining an understanding of their dynamics so as to enable them to compete more effectively, both now and in the future. Planning to enable an organisation to meet its future demand for skills A recognition that As the skills that employers seek become more specialised, employment markets have tightened, leading to increased sophistication in the area of resourcing and talent planning which is reflected in the increased use of proactive diversity management, employer branding, work-life balance initiatives and innovative approaches to job design, The module also requires learners to reflect critically on theory and practice from an ethical and professional standpoint and provides opportunities for applied learning and continuous professional development. Learning Outcomes: Demonstrate an awareness of and a capacity to critically evaluate and reflect upon the nature of, and linkages between key components of a range of alternative resourcing and talent management strategies and processes and their potential contribution to achievement of organisational objectives Indicative Reading list TAYLOR, S. (2008) People resourcing. 4th ed. Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. (New edition: Resourcing and talent management, due August 2010). Key textbooks ARMSTRONG, M. (2009) A handbook of human resource management practice. 11th ed. London: Kogan Page. BACH, S. (ed). (2005) Managing human resources: personnel management in transition. 4th ed. Maldon, MA: Blackwell. BARBER, A. E. (1998) Recruiting employees: individual and organizational perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. BEARDWELL, J. (2007) Recruitment and selection. In: BEARDWELL, J. and CLAYDON, T. (eds). Human resource management: a contemporary approach. 5th ed. Harlow: Pearson Education. COOK, M. (2009) Personnel selection: adding value through people. 5th ed. Chichester: John Wiley. COOPER, D., ROBERTSON, I.T. and TINLINE, G. (2003) Recruitment and selection: a framework for success. Rev. ed. London: Thomson Learning. DOWLING, P., FESTING, M. and ENGLE, A. D. (2007) International human resource management: managing people in a multi-national context. 5th ed. London: Thomson Learning. EDENBOROUGH, R. (2007) Assessment methods in recruitment, selection and performance: a manager s guide to psychometric testing, interviews and selection. London: Kogan Page. GARRISON-JENN, N. (2005) Headhunters and how to use them: a guide for organisations and individuals. London: Profile Books. HORN, P., GRIFFETH, R.W. and HOM, P.W. (1994) Employee turnover. Cincinnati, OH: South Western. ILES, P. Employee resourcing and talent management. In: STOREY, J. (ed). (2007)Human resource management: a critical text. 3rd ed. London: Thomson Learning. JANSEN, P. and DE JONGH, F. (1997) Assessment centres: a practical handbook. Chichester: Wiley. KERRIN, M. and KETTLEY, P. (2003) E-recruitment: is it delivering? Brighton: Institute of Employment Studies. LAROCHE, L. and RUTHERFORD, D. (2007) Recruiting, retaining and promoting culturally different employees. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. MAERTZ, C. P. and CAMPION, M. A. (2001) 25 years of voluntary turnover research: a review and critique. In: ROBERTSON, I. T. and COOPER, C.L. (eds) Personnel psychology and human resource management; a reader for students and practitioners. Chichester: Wiley. PILBEAM, S. and CORBRIDGE, M. (2006) People resourcing: contemporary HRM in practice. 3rd ed. Harlow: Financial Times / Prentice Hall. ROBERTS, G. (2005) Recruitment and selection. 2nd ed. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. SEARLE, R. H. (2003) Selection and recruitment: a critical text. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. SMITH, M and ROBERTSON, I. T. (1993) The theory and practice of systematic personnel selection. London: Macmillan. SPARROW, P. and COOPER, C.L. (2003) The employment relationship: key challenges for HR. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. SPARROW, P. (2006) International recruitment, selection and assessment. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. TAYLOR, S. (2002) The employee retention handbook. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. TOPLIS, J., DULEWICZ, V. and FLETCHER, C. (2005) Psychological testing: a manager s guide. 4th ed. London: Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. WALLEY, L. and SMITH, M. (1998) Deception in selection. Chichester: John Wiley. WOOD, R. and PAYNE, T. (1998) Competency-based recruitment and selection. Chichester: Wiley. WOODRUFFE, C. (2007) Development and assessment centres: identifying and developing competence. 4th ed. London: Human Assets In addition, students should read the CIPD magazine, People Management and read relevant articles in the online journals Please see Bb links within resources tab. Useful web sites: www.wales.gov.uk www.irsemploymentreview.com www.managementandleadershipcouncil.org www.cipd.co.uk www.personneltoday.com www.peoplemanagement.co.uk www.bitc.org.uk www.shrm.org www.acas.org.uk www.efa.org.uk www.dataprotection.gov.uk www.equalityhumanrights.com www.isrsurveys.co.uk www.eef.org.uk www.statistics.gov.uk www.lg-employers.gov.uk www.hse.gov.uk www.dfes.gov.uk www.workfoundation.co.uk www.dfee.gov.uk www.ilo.org www.berr.gov.uk www.un.org www.bbc.co.uk www.tuc.org.uk www.employment-studies.co.uk www.lrd.org.uk www.ft.com www.investorsinpeople.co.uk www.wwt.uk.com www.lsc.gov.uk Teaching Programme: Week: Content: 1 Introduction & Overview to People Resourcing 2 Employment Market and Regulation 3 Human resource planning 4 Job Analysis & Design 5 Recruitment 6 Selection 7 Flexibility 8 Induction & Socialisation 9 Retention & Turnover 10 Succession Planning 11 Employer Branding 12 Strategic Resourcing Poster Presentation and Research Article Overview We live, and indeed are living, in dynamic and turbulent environment. Organisations are faced with many conundrums; the fast and increasing rate and pace of technology, increasingly volatile global markets and economies, not to mention, having to deal with the most complex and unpredictable of all resources today ?people. As managers of course, we not only have to keep up-to-date with these changes, we have to (or should at least) understand where these changes may lead, and what challenges they hold for us and the organisations we represent. Over the coming weeks, we will be covering topics as outlined above. After discussing these topics in our sessions, you will be afforded the opportunity to undertake research into one of these areas. Your analysis and discussion however, will need to be supported by current thinking from contemporary sources on this subject. Objectives Therefore, undertaking this research/presentation exercise will enable you: to develop and demonstrate your understanding of the importance of this type of research and how to undertake such an activity collating, analysing, and synthesising ideas; to demonstrate the application of these ideas through formulating new concepts and subsequent strategies that organisations could use to counter potential contextual implications; to demonstrate the importance of research data and its application as supporting evidence for your conceptual conjecture and postulates. To develop key competencies related to working in groups, problem solving and decision making, communication and influence. Process The two assessments are themed, therefore, the work you undertake for the first, can be used to contribute towards the second.The initial assessment for this module will be an individual Poster Presentations and will take place in your scheduled lecture period week commencing (TBA), and the weekly sessions will [include] provide the opportunity to undertake the research necessary to develop their presentations. Once your research has been collected and all relevant information collated you will then prepare a ONE SLIDE PowerPoint presentation to deliver your findings/ideas in the allocated session. The presentation will be 30 minutes in total, but should take no longer than 15 minutes to deliver as the other 15 minutes will be used to provide feedback and your mark. Handouts, additional notes (for students and lecturers) should be provided for the session, and the group s portfolio of evidence; comprising journal articles, reports, survey data and other research related information, should be available on the date of the presentation. References should be used appropriately throughout the presentations and in all prepared documentation. As far as possible, the subject areas will be decided from within the groups themselves, possibly based on a particular area of interest, area of specialism, or by whatever means. However, topic areas will be allocated by the Module Leader (ML) if there is not an appropriately represented spread of presentations. Feedback will be provided by the ML only, however, guest observers observations and advice will also be considered. This exercise will be extremely useful to all students for assignment 2 preparation. The topics being covered and researched in-depth for your presentation, WILL constitute areas within the final assessment. Therefore, while undertaking this activity, you will also be collectively accruing invaluable information for one another that will enhance your learning and understanding about various issues within their chosen areas of research. As stated above, the second assessment will enable you to build upon the initial research activity undertaken for your Poster Presentation, and will expect you to critically appraise and discuss the research topic/issue they ve previously identified (or a more specific issue extracted from within their topic) and prepare a Research Article of 3000 (+/- 10%). The research should provide a robust discussion of your topic/issue using contemporary sources/references of key theoretical and analytical concepts and frameworks along with contemporary developments and emerging themes, as related to your topic/issue. Therefore, as part of your critical discussion, students should expect to undertake an in-depth literature review critically analysing and reflecting on the nature, scope and use of (in addition to evaluating any contemporary developments and/or future perspectives) by synthesising their understanding and application of their topic (or specific more specific issue) within a people resourcing context. Assignment preparation guidance will be provided as we progress through the module. However, if you have any further queries relating to this activity, please contact the ML immediately. Assessments: Msc Human Resource Management (FT&PT) People Resourcing HR4 S39 Assignment Info Overview: The module will be assessed by means of 100% Coursework. The assessment of this module will normally comprise of 2 elements: Element 1: An Individual 30 minute Poster Presentation (50% of module marks) And ? Element 2: An individual Research Article of 3000 words (50% of module marks) The marks for Element 1 & Element 2are averaged to determine the overall coursework module mark. To pass the module students must achieve an overall minimum mark of 40% in each Element. Students must demonstrate no significant weaknesses (<30%) in either element. Students failing this module are referred in the failed element / component* of assessment only and carry forward any other grade(s) achieved in any element /component of assessment of the same module already completed successfully. Students can only be awarded 40% in any reassessed element / component* of this module, but may achieve a greater overall module grade if the already completed part of the assessment has been graded higher than this. Assignment 1 Assessment date: TBA The initial assessment for this module will be an individual Poster Presentations and will take place in your scheduled lecture period week commencing (TBA), and the weekly sessions will [include] provide the opportunity to undertake the research necessary to develop their presentations. Once your research has been collected and all relevant information collated you will then prepare a ONE SLIDE PowerPoint presentation to deliver your findings/ideas in the allocated session. The presentation will be 30 minutes in total, but should take no longer than 15 minutes to deliver as the other 15 minutes will be used to provide feedback and your mark. Handouts, additional notes (for students and lecturers) should be provided for the session, and the group s portfolio of evidence; comprising journal articles, reports, survey data and other research related information, should be available on the date of the presentation. References should be used appropriately throughout the presentations and in all prepared documentation. Additional Guidance Present, clear, balanced and sufficient (possibly primary) secondary research evidence to support arguments and conclusions. Offer critical analysis of the evidence and arguments Pay attention to the need for logically constructed statements, conclusions and possibly recommendations Use and acknowledge relevant sources and reference to support arguments Provide a full list of references used in your text at the end of your assignment using the Harvard system. A presentation matrix will be used for assignment 1 and describes the different levels of attainment for each criteria. The overall mark for a piece of work will reflect the different levels of attainment which may achieved across different criteria. Assignment 2 Assessment date: TBA The second piece of coursework an individual essay/article of 3000 (+/- 10%) words accounting for the remaining 50% and submitted late in the module will provide students to continue and augment their research predicated for their presentations or (with the agreement of the module leader) engage in a different theme covered within the module. To undertake this assessment comprehensively, students should identify their own research question/title from contemporary ideas related to their topic chosen to be investigated for their poster Presentation. Students will be expected to critically evaluate, synthesis and discuss their research question, including the changing contexts (from within and outside organisations) using contemporary references to support their propositions, thus enabling a robust evaluation and synthesis of current ideas. As part of their critical evaluations/discussions, students should expect to undertake an in-depth literature review critically analysing and reflecting on the nature, scope and use of key theoretical and analytical concepts and frameworks of contemporary developments and emerging themes, as it relates to their particular topic. To further demonstrate their understanding and application reference should be made to personal professional experience using their own company and/or case studies. Additional Requirements: The reflection must: A research article format must be adopted Address the topic under investigation; Be your own independent work and free from plagiarism (see below) by including clear indication and referencing where material included is not your own; Use extensive elements from theory and research as a basis for explanation; Utilise sufficient sources to be academically credible; Use Harvard style citation and referencing; Be written in an appropriate academic style; Be a maximum of 3000 words (not including title page, appendices footnotes and reference lists); Be word processed, using 1.5 spacing; Have been spell checked and proof-read; Be on A4 paper and have black text; Be formatted with 2 cm margins on the left, top and bottom, and 4 cm on the right; Be submitted via turn-it-in assignment tab by 12 midnight on the due date. Be anonymous but have your ID number and page numbers on each page. Notes: Assignments that do not conform to these instructions may be returned to you without being marked. Assignments that are late will not be marked (no extensions will be given). Maintain a copy of your receipt as proof in case your work goes missing. Keep your own copy of your work in case the copy you hand in is lost. Coursework Extensions: Extensions will not be permitted and students who encounter difficulties while completing coursework should contact their award tutor to discuss their options. Late submission of coursework without mitigating circumstances being accepted will result in that piece of work being graded as a zero. Plagiarism This is primarily defined as copying or paraphrasing another person s work, be it published, or unpublished, without clearly acknowledging it . Regardless of whether it is intentionally or unintentionally done, plagiarism is considered to be cheating and is strictly forbidden and may be heavily penalised. To avoid accusations of plagiarism, ensure that you: fully cite and reference materials you use; don t share your work with your friends, housemates and classmates etc; work independently when you are writing up your coursework; use someone not on the module to do your proofreading; pick your printing up immediately when using the university printers and if in doubt about this issue ask your lecturers or the staff in the Drop-In Centre at the LRC for assistance. Marking and Return of Marked Coursework All assessment at the University of Glamorgan is subject to quality assurance procedures. This means that while every attempt will be made to return the majority of marked coursework within 20 working days, all fail (i.e. below 40%), distinction (i.e. 70% or greater) and a few pass graded assignments will be retained to form part of the quality assurance sample. The remaining marked assignments will be handed back to students personally during tutorials or student scheduled appointments. Grades on any returned coursework remain provisional until such time as they have been quality checked and are accepted by appropriate exam boards. The following grid will be used for assignment 2 and describes the different levels of attainment for each criteria. The overall mark for a piece of work will reflect the different levels of attainment which may achieved across different criteria. Additional Guidance [2] Present, clear, balanced and sufficient [primary and/or] secondary evidence to support arguments and conclusions. Offer critical analysis of the evidence and arguments Pay attention to the need for logically constructed statements and recommendations Use and acknowledge relevant sources and reference to support arguments Provide a full list of references used in your text at the end of your assignment using the Harvard system. The marking matricies below will be used for assignment 1 and 2 respectively. People Resourcing HR4S39 Marking grid PRESENTATION ASSESSMENT SHEET TITLE_____________________________________________________________________ PRESENTERS _____________________________________________________________ ASSESSOR ______________________________ TIME ALLOWED/TAKEN ______ /_____ Area Assessed Comments Presentation, Delivery (10%) Volume, speed, intonation, eye contact, familiarity with material, Co-ordination, links, leadership, continuity, handovers, support, response to questions Handling, quality, Powerpoint use, variety of visual aids Skill: Communications & Working with Others Content/Knowledge & Understanding (30%) Clarity, fluid narrative, structure, relevance, use of humour, response to questions Skill: Managing and Developing Self Research/Critique/Analysis & Sythesis (40%) Evidence of scope of secondary sources, Comprehensive inter-relation of the theory with the practice Detailed and insightful analysis of the assessment subject area focus. Identification of key issues? Critically evaluates theoretical models situationissues discussed Skill: Managing Tasks & Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Conclusion & References (20%) Threading, logical summary and response to questions. Appropriately formatted references made available. General Comments ___________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Overall Grade ______% People Resourcing HR4S39 Marking grid Assignment 2 Student Number : Student Number : Programme: Programme: Module : Module : Code: MARK 29 or less 30 39 40 49 50 59 60 69 70 + CONTENT: Has the question been answered? The question has not been addressed Some parts of the question has been addressed but not to a satisfactory level Some parts of the question have not been addressed appropriately The question has been addressed but in places there is a lack of depth to the discussions The questions have been addressed well and in some depth The questions have been addressed very well with some interesting and appropriate insights TOPIC KNOWLEDGE Evidence of wider reading and an ability to be able to apply the knowledge to the assessment question No evidence of wider reading. Little evidence of wider reading. Limited evidence of wider reading but in places a there is a lack of application. Some evidence of wider reading and in places an application to the discussions Evidence of wider reading and in places an appropriate application to the discussions. Very good evidence of wider reading and application to support the discussions SYNTHESIS Comprehensive inter-relation of the theory with the practice No integration of the theory with the practice Very little integration of the theory with the practice Some integration of the theory with the practice but in little depth Good integration of the theory with the practice Good summary and application of the theory Succinct, effective summaries of the theory. Excellent use of the theory to support the discussions. ANALYSIS Detailed and insightful analysis of the assessment subject area focus. Identification of key issues? No analysis of the subject area Largely descriptive with no identification and analysis of central issues. Limited insight into the issues. Some good analytical observations. Good, detailed analysis. Comprehensive range of issues identified and discussed fully. CRITIQUE Critically evaluates theoretical models situationissues discussed No criticality Uncritical acceptance of theoretical models Some attempt to critically evaluate but in very little depth Some critical discussions but limited Good critical assessment. Independent thought displayed. Full critical assessment and substantial individual insight. REFERENCING Thorough and accurate citation and referencing No referencing No referencing Limited/poor referencing Some inconsistencies in referencing Appropriate referencing Appropriate referencing PRESENTATION Logical and coherent structure to argument and effective presentation No structure apparent. Poor presentation. Poor structure. Poor presentation. Acceptable, but uneven structure. Reasonable presentation. Reasonable structure. Good presentation. Good argument. Well presented material. Excellent argument. Very effective presentation format. METHODOLOGY Methodological principles discussed and inter-related with report. No discussion or integration Poor discussion and integration Some inclusion but largely descriptive and unrelated Reasonably discussed and integrated with research. Good discussion and integration of principles with research. Excellent and integrated discussion of principles with research. ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ADDITIONAL COMMENTS A Guide to Writing Assignments Assignments are a key component of the assessment of your studies but many assignments that contain good thoughts and ideas are ruined (and get less marks) because of basic preparation and writing errors. The following are some tips on the mechanics of writing assignments. These should always be read in conjunction with other instructions given by your lecturers. If you are having problems ASK FOR HELP early rather than the day or the week before an assignment is due. Layout: For ease of handling for the marker, follow the instructions on page 11 and 12 and ensure: Use at least a 12 pt font that can be easily read (Arial or times are usual). Spell check your work and proof-read for editing and grammar mistakes. Sentence structure and punctuation Some sentence constructions frequently cause problems. These problems are discussed below: a) Capitalisation There is a tendency to use capital letters when they are not required. Only use capitals at the start of a sentence or for the names of people and organisations. E.g. ?the Civil Rights Movement ? becomes ?the civil rights movement ?. b) Spacing As a rule, all items of punctuation should have one space after them, except punctuation that ends sentences (for example full stops). These items of punctuation have two spaces after them. Note that this spacing rules do not apply to brackets The two spaces after full stops also apply in reference lists after the author s initials. c) Exclamation marks (!) The use of exclamation marks in academic writing is very rare, but when you do use them make sure that you only use one students often use double exclamation marks at the end of a sentence to indicate intensity but this is unnecessary and generally considered rude by academics. d) Colons (:) Colons are often used to introduce a quote, a list of items, or to separate clauses in a sentence when the second enlarges or explains the first. Remember that colons never end a sentence so you should not capitalise the next word and you should not put a space between the colon and the word ahead of it. e) Apostrophes ( ) Apostrophes can be used in two ways first as a contraction where part of a word is left out or where two words run together to form one word, or second, to denote possession. As a contraction It is very rare to use contractions in academic writing, as they are not normally considered to be formal enough for the genre. If you do feel the need to use a contraction, make sure that you have got it right. E.g. Do not becomes don t. Indicating Possession Where the noun normally ends with a S you have a choice of either adding an apostrophe, or an apostrophe and a S to the end of the noun. E.g. Mike Davis desk ?. or Mike Davis s desk ?. Where a noun does not end with a S and is singular, add apostrophe-S to the word. E.g. Jane Noon s bag ?. Where a noun does not normally end in a S and is plural, add S-apostrophe to the word. E.g. The books covers ?. Where the noun changes when it is plural, an apostrophe-s is appropriate. E.g. The c


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