Exodus Liberation Theology

Exodus Liberation Theology

I I n t r o d u c t i o n On June 3rd 1989 over one hundred thousand pro-democracy protesters demonstrated within Tian’an Men Square, China. The Communist Government, under control of the Premier Li Peng, declared marshal law and the People’s Republic Army marched with guns and tanks over the sprits of the country, and the rest of the world. Television footage showed protesters standing defiant, awaiting the approaching tanks, ending with their own demise. Hundreds of protesters were killed and tens of thousands were injured, arrested, imprisoned, or executed, all in the name of liberation. This is not the first time that the oppressed have risen up against despotism. The earliest, and more so know, is the account of Moses and the liberation of the Jewish people from Rameses II, Pharaoh of Egypt. The idiom “Let my people go”?” (Ex 5:1 ), has transcended to present day life. The essay will first briefly discussing the subject of Liberation Theology, identifying key principals associated with liberation by briefly introducing the subject and considering historical text, with the aim of clarifying the subject of liberation from a modern prospective. The essay will continue by exploring the Exodus parable and isolated key themes with a view of the previous section. Theme’s of the Exodus parable will them be projected and correlated against modern situations with patterns adopted through Liberation Theology. Conclusions will then be drawn from throughout the essay. I I L i b e r a t i o n T h e o l o g y In the late 1960’s a new social and intellectual movement appeared in Latin America. The movement arose as a result of socio-political factors that affected the economic climate of many populated areas of South America. People were not respected as citizens but as subjects. Poverty, famine, and finally civil war grew within the countries until, like the Jewish ancestries of Egypt, they rose up a…


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