Happiest people accept change

Happiest people accept change

It is said that the happiest people on earth are those who do not fear change, but accept and embrace it. By looking at different texts, media-forms and everyday human life, this statement can be justified, as well as disproved. Sons and Lovers, written by D.H Lawrence, is a story about a young man named Paul and his relationships with his family, especially his mother, his girlfriends and his environment. Set in an English working-class mining town, it tells the reader of the problems with the society of that time, the trials that Paul went through and the consequences of many of his actions. One instance of the reluctance to accept change can be seen in Paul. Throughout the story, he is constructed by Lawrence to be unwilling to accept that his mother is going to become a decreasing influence in his life as he grows up, although in some parts it would seem that he wanted to. When Paul starts to see Miriam as more than a friend, he is torn between his affection for Miriam and his desire to keep his life the same in terms of his relationship with his mother and with other women. This rift causes him great misery and he chooses to stay with his mother and leave Miriam. Later, when he finds another girlfriend, this problem comes up again, and once more, it causes him great misery. Again, though, he chooses to stay with his mother and she continues to be the greatest influence in his life, right up until she dies. Lawrence wanted the reader to think about change and the impact it can have on the individual. A Clockwork Orange, written by Anthony Burgess, was made into a film by Stanley Kurbrick in 1971. The story is set in futuristic Britain and is about a boy, Alex de Large, who is the leader of hi gang, or droogs, and together they commit senseless crimes including rape, robbery and bashings. One particular bashing goes wrong and Alex accidentally kills his victim. He tries to run but he is betrayed by his droogs and ends up in j…


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