Hazard Mitigation

Hazard Mitigation

Introduction This project discusses the topics of hazard mitigation, what it is and its importance, the difference between structural and non-structural mitigation strategies, and the hazard planning process. What is Hazard Mitigation? As the cost of disasters rise, it is more apparent that pre-disaster actions must be implemented to reduce the amount of devastation to a local or state community. These pre-disaster actions fall into the meaning of mitigation. Mitigation is defined as “sustained actions taken to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property from hazards and their effects” (IS 393, pg 1-2). There are four phases of Emergency Management: Preparedness, Response, Recovery, and Mitigation. The overall end goal of mitigation is to reduce risk. The success of the mitigation efforts will decrease the requirements, the impact, and the expense of a hazardous event. The Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 requires communities and states to develop a hazard mitigation plan. This plan must be approved and in place before any post-disaster funds are administered (FEMA 364, p.11). To reduce risk you must find out what hazards are in the community. This starts the process of mitigation. There are three phases of hazard mitigation: ???ú Hazard Identification – Identify “all of the hazards that potentially threaten a community” (IS 393, p. 1-5). ???ú Hazard Analysis – Analyze each hazard individually to determine the degree of threat that is posed by each. ???ú Strategy Preparation – Identify mitigation priorities and mitigation measures to address these priorities. Determine resources needed to implement these measures and identify potential sources for technical and financial assistance. “Hazard mitigation is the only phase of emergency management specifically dedicated to breaking the cycle of damage, reconstruction, and repeated damage” (FEMA 364, p.11). Examples of mitigation are land use planning, adopti…


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