How do practices of spiritualism gain popularity in ninteent

How do practices of spiritualism gain popularity in ninteent

How do practices of Spiritualism gain popularity in nineteenth century Britain and why? Spiritualism started in America, New York, in 1848 by Catherine and Margaret Fox. They heard banging’s and knockings in there house and started to communicate with the spirits which later became known as Spirit Rapping. Four years later it was introduced to England by Mrs Hayden, who advertised for services as a spiritualist medium in April 1952. Despite criticism from respected journals within a year numerous small groups were meeting to summon up the spirits. In 1853 Spiritualism and the abolition of slavery were the foremost topics of the day. In England spiritualism spread rapidly in all levels of society. In literary and artistic circles, middle class and intellectuals and professionals particularly in the midlands, north of England amongst the industrialised working class. In the Northeast of England it was often the miners, pit men, weavers and factory hands who became Spiritualism’s most ardent supporters. Spiritualism embraced a full spectrum of beliefs because it presented a rational explanation of the survival of the spirit. This notion of spirituality lead to greater understanding or insight into the nature of the self and this received proof of immortality and the joy of renewed contact with lost loved ones were powerful common factors in the acceptance in spiritualism. (McCabe, 1920) In 1863 James Burns established the “progressive library and spiritual institution” in Southampton Row in London. From here he disseminated a vast array of literature covering every aspect of popular spiritualist culture. Through his newspapers and lectures he had a profound impact especially on provincial believers and helped many mediums to start practising spiritualism. During the 1860’s and 1870’s a number of weekly papers and spiritualist publications began circulation including the founding of “light’ in 1881 a paper t…


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