Huck finn character anaylysis

Huck finn character anaylysis

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is a bildungsroman. Huck Finn’s growth throughout the novel is not as shocking as some of Tom Sawyer’s ideas but is astounding nonetheless. His moral and psychological growth is marvelous but does not outshine the story. He learns to care for others and how to make good decisions for himself and other individuals. Huck also learns to be less gullible and manages to stay independent. He progresses through the story with a learning experience at every turn of the Mississippi. Huck is introduced as a character that cares only for his own well being. He has minimal feelings for others including those who look after him and his best interests, such as the widow and Mr. Thatcher. Huck joins Tom’s gang of murderers and believes that they are really going to rob and kill. He is disappointed in Tom’s lack of will to achieve actual murders and robberies. He then is taken away by his father who wants the money has. His father’s cabin was “over the Illinois shore where it was woody and the warn’t no houses but an old log hut in a place where the timber was so thick you couldn’t find it if you didn’t know where it was. (160) He feels more free here because he doesn’t have to go to school or be on time for dinner like he did at the widow’s house. However his father is abusive so he takes it to his head that he’ll run away and float along the Mississippi on a raft. Huck wishes to leave his father when he leaves to trade the logs they found for cash or booze. He digs a hole under the cabin, takes everything that he finds potentially useful and smears blood and his hair everywhere to make it seem as though he had been murdered. He desires to have Tom’s knowledge of how to do the fake murder correctly but, “nobody could spread himself like Tom Sawyer in such a thing as that.” (166) This shows that Huck still is a boy who like…


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