Juxtaposition of Blake and Burns

Juxtaposition of Blake and Burns

This is my juxtaposition of Blake and Burns based on the poems that were assigned to the class to read. In Blake’s poetry there is an underlining disdain or dislike for the Church. That is the Church system and the Church’s teachings as a whole not just one church in particular. I refer to the poem “The Chimney Sweeper” (1789), where Blake seems to poke fun at the fact that these children are taught that if they live in this terrible life of theirs and if they are good that they will be able to go to heaven when they finally leave this world behind. Blake also makes a point in the later, shorter version of “The Chimney Sweeper” (1794) to point out that the child is crying because the parents are at the church praying, and have left the child alone. The poem also states that when the parents saw the child happy they dressed the child in the “clothes of death” and taught the how “to sing the notes of woe.” The child also refers to “God & his Priest” as the ones “Who make up a heaven of our misery.” Blake’s “The Garden of Love” (1794) also deals with the Church and not in a flattering manner. This poem deals with what seems to be and older person returning to a place that he or she had played at an earlier time. This old playground or play area is now taken over by a church with a cemetery. The church also has a sign over the door that reads “Thou shalt not”, which could be a sign that Blake is not happy with some of the rules the church has imposed on the society. There is mentions of the “Priests in black gowns” tying up all of the “joys & desires.” In a different direction from Blake’s poems, the poems from Burns we read for class have a nature theme to them, not a antichurch theme. Burns’ poem “Green grow the rashes” both the title and the chorus refer to the color green. The color green is typically associated with nature. Then there are the growing plants, another p…


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