King Lear is a play of tragedy, betrayal and madness

King Lear is a play of tragedy, betrayal and madness

King Lear is a play of tragedy, betrayal and madness; in which greed and loyalty are both tested amongst the characters within this classic play. The way in which the play is perceived by its audience, however, depends on the style in which the play is read. In the following document we will look at the play of King Lear, its dramatic techniques and its characters; through two different critical theories “? the Marxist and the psychoanalytical critical theories. These two theories are apparent throughout the whole play of King Lear; and are highly focused upon in the Storm scene (scene3, act 4) and the tragic finale (scene5, act 3) which this document will be focused on. The storm scene from its very beginning affects the psychological way we look at the scene, in which the setting is one of eerie darkness with a constant downpour of depressing hard rain. The discomfort of this weather resembles that of which lies in the mind of Lear, who opens the scene speaking of how “this tempest” within his mind takes away “all feelings”. As we look at this scene from a psychoanalytical approach, we see that madness is taking over Lear, who upon meeting “Poor Tom”, finds sense amongst the “unaccommodated man’s” riddles of nonsense. The fool takes notice of Lear and Edgar’s actions, in which with dramatic irony he states that “this cold will turn us all into fools and madmen”. The approach of Gloucester tries to remind Lear of the accepted norm, asking “hath your grace no better company?” , but Lear seems to take no notice and prefers the company of the unstable; who he is slowly becoming. Gloucester, however, does not judge Lear of his new-found madness, as he explains to Kent that the sudden actions of his daughters if he were in Lear’s situation would too send him into a state of mental illness, asking “Canst though blame him?” However, when we look at this scene from a Marxist approach, we see the scene in …


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