Life in the Medieval Period

Life in the Medieval Period

Life in the Medieval Period The world in Medieval Times could be illustrated as gory, barbaric, and uncivilized; however, some of the greatest advancements in culture as we know it were produced from the mindsets in these stereotyped “Dark Ages.” While corruption and cruelty was indeed happening in the courts, the church, and the streets, this period in time produced new knowledge and ways of thinking: ways we have adapted today. Europe suffered in this era in more ways than one. While the rich dined in excess, the peasantry did without. People were illiterate, suffering the plagues, or famishing in their miniscule and cramped huts. The life-span for a woman was about 24 years (pg.55). When Rome fell to the Huns, Catholicism fell on the masses: everyone was imposed to be devout Christians. In the minds of the people “The Church was indivisible, the afterlife a certainty; all knowledge was already known” (pg.27). People were strong in faith until a series of events “shattered” (pg.29) its credibility. The Church was first to be questioned. Humanism was spreading quickly by way of professors, through the countries and common people were becoming literate. Money was being paid to absolve sins and now, members of the Church were becoming non-celibate; breaking a rule made by the Vicars of Christ. Was this not a sin? Well as it was, only strong families of great power, such as the Medicis or the Aragons, dared to question the clergy (pg.42). Morals were quickly being lost as prostitution and adultery became frequent and it is said to be due in large part to the religious transformation to come. Martin Luther, a name synonymous with revolution, was a strict Catholic and professor until he saw indulgences being traded for sins and this possibly was reason to start his movement to risk his life and create 95 theses challenging the Church. Luther was sought after over and over for heresy but his ideas spread despite e…


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