Loyalty of Love

Loyalty of Love

Loyalty of Love Medea and Eliduc are both stories of love and anger, but differ drastically in their handling of these emotions. When betrayed by those she loves, Medea is vindictive with her anger, punishing and acting out violently against those disloyal to her. In contrast, Guilliadun, the main female character in Eliduc, turns her anger inward when abandoned by her love, harming herself instead of others. By acting out against those who are disloyal to her, Medea appears to express a belief that one cannot deceive others and also live a glorious life. Because Medea is devoted so strongly to her husband, when she discovered he was taking another bride, she became infuriated. She had reminded her husband of what she had once done for him; how for him she had betrayed her father and her people, and for him she had caused Pelias, who he feared, to be killed by his own daughters. Medea became ruled by her anger, using Gods, Spirits, and even her own children to destroy her husband’s life. Only when his passion for life was fully crushed by the deaths of those he loved was she satisfied, stating, “You will delight me twice as much again if you say they died in agony” (Pg 459). Medea is a masterly presentment of passion in its secret folds. The suffering and sensitiveness of injured love are strongly drawn, and with the utmost nicety of observation, passing from one stage to another until they participate in the awful deed of vengeance. Medea, Hartness 2 wrathful in her actions, was elated by the pain and suffering she caused the man she once loved. Medea showed the loyalty of love to the end. In Eliduc, it is important to focus on the faith and religious undertones. Two women involved with Eliduc turn their emotional distress inward when they discover each other’s existences. Though married, Eludic falls in love with Guilliadun, and becomes torn between his new love and his wi…


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