Nelson Mandela and the Apartheid

Nelson Mandela and the Apartheid

During the mid to late 20th century, South Africa was filled with discriminatory thoughts. Why? Because of the Apartheid policy. However one man stood up against this injustice. His name was Nelson Mandela. Mandela was part of the African National Congress (ANC), an organisation which contributed to the dismantling of the Apartheid, although numerous other influences also contributed to its disbandment. Many people played an important part in the process, however none more significant than Mandela. The Apartheid was a major issue in South Africa. It forced racial segregation on all of the country and created fear and despair in all those of non-European heritage. The Apartheid prohibited the black population from mixing with the white population in education, housing, employment and even on buses and park benches. It became policy in 1948 after Dr. Daniel Malan, leader of the National Party, was elected Prime Minister of South Africa. Malan once stated that, “Apartheid is a way of saving the white civilisation from vanishing beneath the black sea of South Africa’s non-European populations.’ Many of Malan’s and the Apartheid’s supporters believed that the policy would allow each race to reach its full potential and not let its culture be influenced by any outside person, group or organisation. However the tables had already shifted in 1918, before Malan and later Prime Ministers even came into power. On July 18th, 1918, a boy was born in Transkei, South Africa to the Chief of the Tembu Tribe, Henry Mandela. His name was Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela. At age the age of 24, after studying at the University College of Fort Hare and the University of Witwatersrand, Mandela became qualified in law. In 1944, he joined the ANC and the resistance to the Apartheid policies in 1948. Between 1956 and 1961, Mandela went on trial for treason but was later acquitted. The ANC was banned in 1960 so Mandela argued that a …


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