Oedipus the king

Oedipus the king

Oedipus the King According to Webster’s Dictionary, fate is defined as “A power that supposedly predetermines what is to happen” (257). In the play “Oedipus Rex” each character is touched by fate directly or indirectly. The author of the play Sophocles pens the story of a man who was destine from birth to be both martyr and hero, he could never be one without the other. Picture it, city of Thebes, between 430 and 425 B.C.E. The new, wise king had just lifted the Sphinx’s curse. Oedipus was able to solve the Sphinx’s riddle, ridding Thebes of her curse and banishing her for good. Infertile soil, burnt pastures and dead babies now currently plague the city. The people of Thebes turn to their new wise king for help so Oedipus has sent his brother in law, Creon, to seek out the gods. Throughout the course of events of this play, Oedipus goes from being wise to being paranoid. His paranoia sends him on a downward spiral and his character starts to unravel. This is due to a predestined fate that was already planned out for Oedipus. The gods had decided his downfall, and no matter what Oedipus did his demise would have occurred. The first piece of evidence that his fate was already decided is that a drunken man called him a bastard. Hearing this sparked Oedipus’s curiosity, however no one would speak to him about this incident so he went to speak with Delphi, the Oracle. Delphi informs Oedipus of his cursed prophecy. When Oedipus learned that he was predestined to kill his father and sleep with his mother, he decides to leave Corinth to spare Merope and Porybus, the two he believes to be his parents. What he did not know was that he was given to Merope and Porybus by a herdsman, and that they were not his real parents. Leaving Corinth helped Oedipus in the least way possible. His destiny was to kill his father, Laius, and to marry his mother, Jocasta. Both of which came true despite any efforts of Oedipus to avoid this horrid fate. A me…


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