Please make use of the following paragraph heading Custom Research Paper Assistance

Please make use of the following paragraph heading Custom Research Paper Assistance

Introduction The effectiveness, usability, and applicability of any curriculum are determined by a myriad of factors. In Canada, race, culture, and ethnicity have a direct influence on the appropriateness and efficiency with which a given curriculum is implemented. Studying these factors is useful to teachers and learners to help adopt and apply the most appropriate curriculum. Learners have the opportunity to develop the means for adapting to various environments and choosing the best approaches to excelling in their studies. Literature Review There are several real-life examples that can be used to illustrate how ethnicity impacts a student s experience in Canada s educational system. The experience of Aoki (1983) reveals some challenges that a non-native may encounter when trying to apply to a foreign system. As a Japanese-Canadian teacher, the author explains that experiencing ethnicity is like passing through subjectivity in the course of duty (Aoki, 1983). Another study by Elbaz-Luwisch (2004) investigates how a violent and multicultural environment can possibly influence a student s educational experience. Amidst threats and incidents of death, multicultural communities find it difficult establish a consistent curriculum. It is obvious from the example set by Jewish and Arab Israelites from the University of Haifa that participants in multicultural societies experience high levels of vulnerability with regards to the applicability of a curriculum. According to Gaztambide-Fernandez and Murad (2011), the survival and thriving of a curriculum in any society relies on the collective responsibility of all the players in that specific curriculum. It is necessary to take into consideration all of the probable consequences that could result from a failure to investigate the reasons that various forms of curriculum collapse. This is a claim that is supported by Maudlin s (2014) idea that White supremacy displays aspects of racism that can only be eliminated through relevant interventions. Rationale The research seeks to provide an explanation for how culture, race, and ethnicity are likely to hinder the effective delivery of education using the case study of the Canadian curriculum. This will be determined through a set of research questions. Among the questions are: 1. In what ways do culture, ethnicity, and racism affect Canada s educational curriculum? 2. Is it reasonable to abandon hope that Canada s educational system will succeed given the current cultural and racial tides? 3. From a racial or cultural diversity perspective, is it possible to design an all-inclusive curriculum for Canada? Evaluation of Literature Secondary Sources The research will derive data from multiple secondary sources. To determine the accuracy of these secondary sources, a critical synthesis and critique of the content will be performed. Most of the sources were chosen for critique will be scholarly materials from academic libraries. Coursework Material Additional material will be related to those used during the course. Notes, readings, posts, and assignments will be collectively analyzed to investigate how ethnicity, race, and cultural issues impact curriculum in the Canadian system. Conclusion It is important to analyze curriculum using cultural and ethnic contexts. Any educational system has to do all that is possible to eliminate the dangers that arise as a result of the integration of systems. With any integrated educational system, there are bound to be hostilities, which can be controlled through proper investigations into the root causes. References Aoki, T. T. (1983). Experiencing ethnicity as a Japanese Canadian teacher: Reflections on a personal curriculum. Curriculum Inquiry, 13(3), 321-335. Elbaz-Luwisch, F. (2004). How is education possible when there s a body in the middle of the room? Curriculum Inquiry, 34(1), 9-27. Gaztambide-Fern?ndez, R. & Murad, Z. (2011). Out of line: Perspectives on the browning  of curriculum and pedagogy. Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 8(1), 14-16. Maudlin, J. G. (2014). The abandonment of hope: Curriculum theory and white moral responsibility. Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 11(2), 136-153.


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