Politics in Media: A Readers Perception

Politics in Media: A Readers Perception

Politics in Media: A Readers Perception Everywhere you look today, weather it is on the television or in the newspaper, it’s obvious that election time is drawing near. From CNN to the New York Times, the country is abuzz over this year’s candidates. I must admit that I am quite perplexed on how the media is handling this election year. I have not seen very much coverage on the issues that each candidate is purposing to the American people. Instead, I have noticed the use of “he said, she said” propaganda as a way of communicating each party’s message. I think it is detrimental as American voters that we know the issues at hand and filter out the needless barrage of opinionated journalism. One example comes from the accompanying article, which I found inside the Indianapolis Star. In his article, The Virtues of a Boring Candidate, David Brooks sums up presidential candidate John Kerry as a humdrum speaker who spent too much time in congress. He also points out that he might know too much information, as such that he makes bore some speeches and elaborates too much on topics. This leads you to question the author’s validity in the political field of journalism. I am comforted and believe most people feel the same when we know that our President is knowledgeable about the issues. When choosing a President, I do not think that the American public is really concerned about someone who will keep them entertained when they turn on their televisions. People elect a President in which they feel confident that they will make right and moral decisions based on the thought of the nation. This is just biased journalism intended to persuade the reader to feel how Mr. Brooks does. Now, let us look at the benefits of factual journalism. When people are presented with the facts, it is clear and concise to the reader what the author is trying to tell them. There is no room for opinion, and the reader …


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