Politics of American Foreign Policy

Politics of American Foreign Policy

Politics of American Foreign Policy Issue Paper Part IThe war with Iraq began on March 20, 2003, but war in Iraq has been prevalent for a long time. Iraq has been a threat to the safety of America and the world since the Gulf War and that threat was not going to decease until Saddam Hussein was thrown out of power. Saddam Hussein is the bully of the Middle East. President George W. Bush addressed the nation on March 20, 2003, at 10:15 p.m., 45 minutes after the first attacks were reported, stating that “American and coalition forces are in the early stages of military operations to disarm Iraq, to free its people and to defend the world from grave danger.” (War Against Iraq and Sanger) This declaration came after months of debates with the United Nations and Congress, and most likely all over the world. The decision was a “sobering moment for the nation, because no presidential action is as consequential as the decision to go to war.” (Kusnetz) President Bush stated that he had the support of over thirty five nations throughout the world, but two very strong and vocal countries, Germany and France, did not support President Bush in his decision to go to war. Congress had voted by overwhelming margins to allow President Bush to make the decision of whether or not to declare war against Iraq in an effort to disarm them. But, they made the President promise that he would “exhaust all other diplomatic avenues before taking unilateral action.” (Bock) Congress said that “a vote for [the resolution] is not a vote to rush to war; it is a vote that puts awesome responsibility in the hands of our President and we say to him – use these powers wisely and as a last resort. And it is a vote that says clearly to Saddam Hussein – this is your last chance – disarm or be disarmed.” (Bock) After the war had already began, the President while addressing the nation, stated that there was a necessity for war because, “Our natio…


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