Populism: The Successful Reform of the People’s Party

Populism: The Successful Reform of the People’s Party

Populism: The Successful Reform of the People’s Party The years following the Civil War brought much change and many new ideas to the United States. Some of this change came in the form of groups whose movements during the latter part of the 1800s had a profound affect on American life. As time moved on, many people traveled west to seek a better life with more opportunities. A number of those individuals were farmers who eventually created a group which had a considerable affect on American society. Many of the ambitions of the Populist party eventually became laws in the Progressive Era after they had disbanded. There were three factors which led to the recognition of the Populist party which had an effect on the majority of America. They included the railway strikes, various alliances of farmers, and the elections of 1892 and 1896. Populism was a short-lived movement, whose ideas as well as its followers had a significant impact on American society during the nineteenth century. The Populist movement emerged during the depression of the 1870s and lasted until around 1900. This was an agrarian movement which occurred in the Great Plains and a number of states in the southwest. The farmers came together to form a group after their wages were cut when the cost of productivity rose. Its members believed in the idea of “producerism” which meant that the producer was entitled to the fruits of his own labor. This became of the most prominent principle of workers in American during the nineteenth century. There were many branches of the party, some of which included the National Grange, Farmers’ Alliances, and Knights of Labor. All of these groups strived to achieve the goals set by its members. These goals included the following: free coinage of silver, a popular election for senators, an eight-hour workday, and government ownership of the railroad. The Populist platform included many of issues which concerned …


Comments are closed.