Privacy in the Information Age

Privacy in the Information Age

Privacy in the Information Age Have you ever felt like you were being watched? The feeling may have basis in fact. Many technological advances on the internet have brought up concerns about the protection of Americans’ personal information. Hollywood has fueled these fears with the making of movies like Enemy of the State, which deals with NSA surveillance and the abusive use of the information they obtain. Hollywood dramatizations aside, a growing number of people are concerned about the way computers can be used to search, collect, and store information that could be considered “private”. Information about our personal lives has now become one of the most valued resources in the market today. Without safeguards, this resource can be used to actually violate a person’s privacy. There are internet products and services on the market that we think are helping us, but they could be used against us. Internet users have been concerned about their privacy since its inception, but with the advances and increasing usage of the internet, it is making more and more people uneasy about their privacy. Joshua Quittner quotes Kevin Kelly, executive editor of Wired magazine, as saying, “What’s gone outta whack is we don’t know who knows about us anymore. Privacy has become asymmetrical” (Kennedy, Kennedy, Smith, 327). His concern was that access to information is not equal; information about the public is too easy to access by certain parties, while knowing who has that information is hard to retrieve. Not only do we not know who or how much information is available, but we do not have much chance to verify its accuracy or know who might have access to it. People should consider the concept of a “right” to privacy. Many people believe that it is one of the most basic rights in American society, but nowhere in the constitution does it ever say “right to privacy”, nor does it say it anywhere in the declaration …


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