Proposal Title: Optimization of Spectrum Sensing i Custom Research Paper Assistance

Proposal Title: Optimization of Spectrum Sensing i Custom Research Paper Assistance

Undergraduate Dissertation Handbook Academic Year 2015-16 Introduction Welcome to the third-year of the School of Contemporary Chinese Studies (SCCS). The dissertation is the capstone module for the single honours degree, a research project that is both exciting and daunting. After two or three years of Chinese study, you are now planning to write a very long essay based on research that you will conduct on a topic about China of interest to you. The aim of this module handbook is to guide you in what is expected of your dissertation, how you might organise your approach to researching and writing the dissertation, some pointers on research practices and practical information related to the conduct of research and producing a final dissertation. The Dissertation Module T13172 is an individual research project based on a Chinese studies topic. The topic is one of your own choosing, with the agreement of the module convenor, who will attempt to ensure it is feasible, and the individual dissertation supervisor. It is the final assessment component of the single honours programme in the SCCS, taught over the year and with a credit weight of 40. Each student will develop a dissertation proposal during the autumn semester. Once the proposal is finalised they will follow an agreed programme of independent study and research that might include fieldwork in China (uncommon), analysis of literature and data, and the writing of the dissertation. The aim of the module and the goal of the dissertation is to develop the student s ability to conceptualise and plan a research project related to contemporary China, identify appropriate methodologies for pursuing the project, and deliver a finished piece of research within the scope of the defined topic. What is a dissertation? The undergraduate dissertation will be the longest piece of writing most of you have ever done. What is expected? The required length of the final dissertation is 10,000 words ¤ 10%, not including appendices and bibliography. One approach is to think of the dissertation as three essays of 3000 words with an introductory summary tacked on at the front and a summary conclusion at the rear. Doing so makes it seem less daunting. Importantly, it segments the writing into feasible chunks of text. But there is a little more to writing a dissertation. It has to be connected coherently. And it is this structuring of the writing that makes the dissertation project a bit more than just three long essays strung together. In addition to the final dissertation, you are expected to deliver two intermediate products. The first is a working title and slightly extended abstract. This should be little more than 500 words (a maximum of two A4 pages) that sets out the working title of the dissertation, the aims, the significance and scope (who, what, when, where of the topic, and why you think it is an interesting of important topic to research), and indicate the methods you expect to use in the dissertation (exhaustive literature review and analysis, field work surveys, cases studies, etc). Its aim is to help you focus on the task and help in the selection of the appropriate dissertation supervisor who will serve as you guide. The second intermediate product is an extension of this first abstract proposal. It needs to be about 1,500 words long and should contain a more detailed working out of your topic, including a bullet point outline of the expected chapters, a working bibliography of relevant literature, and a brief justification of the methodology you propose to use. Broadly, your dissertation can be classed as either empirical or theoretical. Each type needs to be approached slightly differently and will also be assessed slightly differently. The guidelines below provide the basics headings and guidance for the assessment of both types. The following summarise the two broad types and what is likely to be expected by an examiner: An empirical dissertation topic will involve the framing of a research problem, a review of the literature related to the research that informs the decision about the data required and the choice of appropriate methodologies for collection of data that is analysed and discussed. In business or economics, for example, this would require the student to propose specific hypothesis and specification of the data based on the literature. The student will next discuss how the data will be collected (e.g., surveys or interviews; or from published sources such as statistical yearbooks or online databases), critique the research instrument, report the data and results of analysis, and discuss the findings. A theoretical dissertation topic is the close reading of the literature related to a topic and the development of plausible hypotheses that could be used to explore empirically the topic or a comprehensive critique of past work. The primary focus is the exhaustive exploration of theories or explanations related to the topic. For example, in an exploration of theories related to the representation of gender in contemporary China as portrayed in current cinema, we would expect a review of the literature from cultural, gender and media studies in general combined with a critical discussion of their use in making sense of gender in China. The major difference between the two approaches is that the empirical approach is usually framed in the epistemological positivist research tradition, a deductive approach where theory informs the approach to research and the data collected. The theoretical approach, however, is likely to be epistemologically interpretative, an inductive view of research where theory emerges from an immersion in research/data. Sometimes, rather artificially in my view, the empirical approach is mostly associated with quantitative methods, while the theoretical approach is more closely associated with qualitative methods. In the appendices below you will find a marking guide for the dissertation that is designed to guide staff in the criteria for assessing each type of dissertation. It indicates to you what examiners are likely to be looking for in your dissertation. Research Ethics RESEARCH ETHICS Students undertaking a dissertation which includes research on human subjects/ethics related issues are required to submit the following three documents to Dr Andreas Fulda via Moodle and copy to their supervisor: Research Ethics Form Participant Consent Form Plain Language Statement Students need to submit the forms and get approval BEFORE they conduct any survey or interview. No research ethics approval will be provided post-facto for human subject research that has already been carried out. Forms need to be provided together with the dissertation proposal. If students at a later stage change their research and the new dissertation project involves research on human subjects they need to re-submit a revised set of research ethics forms to Dr Fulda before they conduct any survey, interview or leave for the internship post. If students did not apply for research ethics clearance before the fixed deadline and later change their mind and want to conduct human subject research this will NOT be possible. This is why students who are not sure whether they will conduct surveys or interviews SHOULD apply for research ethics clearance before the fixed deadline in order to be able to carry out human subject research. Please note that according to the University of Nottingham s Quality Manual 2.1.6 Failure to obtain ethical approval: where work is undertaken without obtaining ethical approval when there is a clear and unambiguous requirement to do so  amounts to academic misconduct (http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/academicservices/qualitymanual/assessmentandawards/academic-misconduct.aspx) Academic Misconduct There are strict rules governing your behaviour in an academic community such as the University of Nottingham. Staff tutors and the Module Coordinator will provide advice on what is expected in the conduct of research, including field work, writing your dissertation, and citing material. You should ensure you understand the rules on plagiarism (or copying), which is a serious offence. For details see the Quality Manual at:- http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/academicservices/qualitymanual/assessmentandawards/academic-misconduct.aspx. All students are advised to read this document. The SCCS s basic citation guide is appended. Guides to researching and writing dissertations There are many books on writing and researching dissertations across all levels, from undergraduate to doctoral studies, as well as many books on quantitative and qualitative research methods. The following are a small selection of the many titles you might locate using the library s catalogue with keywords such as thesis or dissertation of literature review: Denscombe, Martyn. The good research guide for small-scale social research projects. 2nd ed. Maidenhead, England; Philadelphia, Pa: Open University Press. 2003 Fink, Arlene. Conducting research literature reviews: from the internet to paper. 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 2005. Garson, G. David. Guide to writing empirical papers, theses, and dissertations. New York : Marcel Dekker, c2002. Mauch, James E. and Namgi Park. Guide to the successful thesis and dissertation: a handbook for students and faculty. 5th ed. New York : M. Dekker, c2003. Walliman, Nicholas S.R. Your undergraduate dissertation: the essential guide for success. London: SAGE, 2004. Thomas, R. Murray and Dale L. Brubaker. Theses and dissertations: a guide to planning, research, and writing. Westport, Conn.; London: Bergin & Garvey, 2000. Turabian, Kate L. A manual for writers of term papers, theses, and dissertations. 6th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996. For specific textbooks on research methods, the following are widely used and there are many copies in the library. We have purchased copies of some of these primarily for the use of the PhD students. However, these textbooks are in high demand (multiple copies are held in Short Term Loan) and should you find you are unable to obtain access, let the convenors know and you may be able to borrow the School s copy from the Office. Bryman, A. 2004. Social Research Methods, 2nd edition, Oxford: OUP (holdings at many locations, H62.B7). This is a good introductory text for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students that span quantitative and qualitative methods. The SCCS has a copy of the 2008 3rd edition (the content of this edition is barely changed, but the format heavy color printing makes it harder to use in my view and not friendly for carrying). Bryman, A. and E. Bell. 2007. Business research methods. 2nd edition. Oxford: OUP. This is a business-student oriented version of Social Research Methods, and there are many copies of this in various UoN libraries. Kvale, S. 2007. Doing Interviews. London: Sage (Business School Ref H61.28.K8). This the revised shorter version of Kvale s 1996 classic on interviewing, InterViews: an introduction to qualitative research interviewing, London: Sage (several UoN locations, H62.K8). This shorter version is more practical in orientation and the literature is updated. (Sage publishes hundreds of short guides on both quantitative and qualitative research methods). Seale, C., Gobo, G., Gubrium, J.F., Silverman, D. 2007 [2004]. Qualitative Research Practice. Paperback ed. London: Sage. This contains a useful collection of chapters that span the many approaches to qualitative research. Silverman, D. 2005. Doing Qualitative Research. 2nd edition. London: Sage. A copy of the 3rd edition (2008) is available for loan from the School s office. Yin, Robert K. 2003. Applications of case study research. 2nd ed. Thousand Oaks, Calif.; London: Sage. Yin, Robert K. 2003. Case study research: design and methods. 3rd ed. Thousand Oaks, Calif.; London: Sage. Numerous copies in various libraries, but in heavy demand (H62.Y4). Can also use the 2nd edition (1994). The above list is far from exhaustive. There are many excellent research methods books. Since writing such textbooks is an industry in itself, there are also many that might leave something to be desired. If you find a text that you like by all means use that rather than any of the above. Research Resources for China The most important Chinese-language resource for research is our subscription to the China Academic Journals (CAJ) database, which gives you full-text online access to more than 7000 Chinese language journals. The CAJ can be accessed anywhere from any computer within the University IP range, and later from the eLibrary Gateway even when you are off campus. To log on to CAJ click on the following URL: http://cnki.en.eastview.com/kns50/Navigator.aspx?ID=CJFD This link will open you in the English language interface. You can search using English or Chinese terms, though the fuzzy logic  that does the translation sometimes doesn t quite get it right. It is nevertheless a quick way to start and useful if you are not certain what is the right Chinese search term. The articles are normally available as PDFs, but sometimes you might need the special CAJ-Viewer from the site to read the articles. There is a reasonable guide to its use from the screen-top tab and the University of Melbourne East Asian Library has a set of excellent guides for CAJ, including how to set up EndNote to handle Chinese (there is also an EndNote filter for importing citation details direct from the CAJ database instead of retyping). See: http://www.lib.unimelb.edu.au/collections/asian In writing your dissertation you will be expected to undertake a literature review. A literature review is a focused and critical appraisal of past research relevant to your dissertation topic. It is not a shopping list of everything ever published on the topic. To undertake this review and we will run a session on how to do so you will be expected to use the various sources that can be accessed via the eLibrary gateway. Some journals can be accessed without using the eLibrary simply from any computer within the University IP range. From within the eLibrary system the Find Database tab and Find eJournal tab or sections are likely to be most useful. If you know the name of a particular journal you are looking for, simply go to the Find eJournal tab. If you want to search across many different journals, you should go to the Database tab. You can select a topic area set of databases, or simply select the list and scroll to find which one you want to use. I would discourage you from using the MetaSearch tab as this takes a long time and often returns too many target sources. It is better to search sequentially individual databases. Some of the more useful databases for putting together your working bibliography come from the eJournal collection under the Find Database tab. These include: ABI/Inform Global (ProQuest): full text selected newspapers, trade journals and academic journals. Business Source Premier (EBSCO): full text selected newspapers, trade journals and academic journals. Specific publishers databases including Blackwell Synergy, Cambridge Journals Online, Emerald Fulltext, Oxford University Press, Science Direct (Elsevier), Sage Journals Online, Wiley Interscience Journals (note that Blackwell and Wiley merged last year and are progressively merging their online services). There are also specialist subject area databases. Useful ones include: Bibliography of Asian Studies: Covers broad all subjects in the humanities (and to a lesser extent social sciences) on East, Southeast and South Asia. EconLit: An index to leading economic journals and the first place to start if your dissertation topic is economics-based. There are many other databases, both restricted access that you need to connect to via the University and those that are public. Useful public ones for China research include the National Bureau of Statistics web site in Beijing that allows access to past issues of the Chinese Statistical Yearbook, the tables from which can be downloaded in Excel for analysis. Other useful sites include the CIA World Factbook, the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the World Trade Organisation, various United Nation s agencies such as UNCTAD, and of course various non-government organisation (NGOs), depending on your research topic and interest, and the viewpoints you seek to examine. Submission Guidelines: Basic Form and Structure A clean, well designed and professional presentation can help to overcome some otherwise difficult or poor aspects of your dissertation: if the examiners can read it easily they will be more kindly disposed toward your research. Your dissertation should be presented in an 11 or 12 point type font. We prefer you to use Times New Roman, Verdana or Arial fonts. Verdana has a large body side relative to its point size (height) so you can use a 10 point font. Line spacing should be at least one-and-half (1.5) lines. This paragraph is set in 10 point Verdana with 1.5 line spaces and a 6-point space following the paragraph, which avoids the need for a double entry to insert space between paragraphs. Leave a slightly larger margin on the left side of the page to allow space for binding the dissertation or report. In general 3.0cm on the left and 2.5cm on the right will be fine. Title page The title page contains the title of the dissertation, your student ID number, the name of the school, month and year. Declaration Every dissertation, thesis or intern report must have statement that the work is submitted in part fulfilment of the specific degree in the School of Contemporary Chinese Studies, the work has not been previously submitted for assessment, and the content is entirely of your own except where otherwise appropriately referenced. Abstract In about 250 words (less than half a page) summarise the aim(s), significance, the data and methods, and major findings. Acknowledgements (optional) Most students will include an acknowledgement to thank people who helped them in the preparation of the dissertation or internship report. Typically these people would include staff at organisations (archives, libraries, companies, etc), key interviewees or a general interviewee note, family and friends, your supervisor, and even quirky thanks to the family cat and dog or Johnny Walker. Table of contents The table of contents will include at a minimum all chapters and the starting page for each chapter. If you have a lot of tables and figures, it is also useful to have a separate list of tables and figures and the page on which they appear. Abbreviations (optional) If your dissertation or report has many abbreviations or acronyms, such as Moftec, ILO, SAAC, SSE, WTO, WIPO, and so on, it is useful for the reader to have a consolidated list of these so they can check should they forget the meaning of any particular abbreviation. Chapters Organise your chapters 1, 2, 3 ? n. Chapter 1: Introduction Chapter 2: ? ? Chapter n: Conclusion The number of chapters will vary from dissertation to dissertation, but typically number five or six for an UG or PG coursework dissertation. Glossary (optional) Glossaries are not used that often now because we can easily include Chinese characters in the main text of the dissertation. In the past it was common to have a glossary organised alphabetically in pinyin and the equivalent Chinese characters. Appendices (optional) Not all dissertations or reports will have an appendix or appendices. Appendices are used to include essential information that is unwieldy to include in the main chapters. For example, your survey or questionnaire instruments, your interview schedule, and so on. Do not include irrelevant data or data from common sources, such as tables copied from the Chinese Statistical Yearbook. Your supervisor can advise you on what material to include in an appendix. The appendix is not included in the word count. Bibliography List all sources consulted for the dissertation. It is typical to divide the bibliography into sections. For example, if you have used a lot of newspapers or web sites, you should have a section for these separate from the academic books and articles you have consulted. Section A: Newspapers and Websites Section B: List of Interviewees Section C: Journal Articles and Books Again, your supervisor can advise you. Model of Title Page and Declaration for Submission of UG Dissertation Student: <Student ID Number> Supervisor: <Supervisor s Title and Name> Declaration: This dissertation is submitted in part fulfilment of the requirements for the Single Honours Degree in Chinese Studies at the University of Nottingham. The work is the sole responsibility of the candidate. None of the work has been previously published or submitted for assessment elsewhere. All data used are acknowledged and any data obtained from interviews or direct observations were collected in accordance with the ethical requirements of the School and the University. Date: ?.. School of Contemporary Chinese Studies, University of Nottingham <month> 201x Appendix 1: Extract from the module specification Assessment details: Dissertation Proposal (5%) Dissertation Project (95%) Aims: Developing skills of problem recognition and definition Raising awareness of and responding to the ethical issues related to gathering data Implementing risk assessment skills related to fieldwork and developing a culture of safety and appropriate research practices The opportunity to develop and apply research design and investigation skills in a field-based environment Enhance skills of information collection and synthesis, and the ability to evaluate the significance and relevance of information Learning outcomes: Knowledge and understanding of: The nature of change in a rapidly transforming China Chinese studies and relevant discipline based concepts of different phenomena Intellectual skills: Identify, formulate and evaluate research questions or problems Identify, develop and evaluate appropriate research methodologies Adopt critical analytical skills in relation to interpreting information collected in a field setting Interpret and synthesise information and recognise relevance Undertake reflective and critical analysis of Chinese studies issues Develop a sustained and reasoned argument Identify and evaluate relevant theoretical issues in relation to the dissertation topic Professional (practical) skills: Record, categorise and present information collected in a field setting Develop writing and organisational skills to convey analyses in clear concise terms Development and implementation of risk assessment and a culture of safety in relation to research Demonstrate awareness and appropriate responses to ethical issues, including potential cross-cultural sensitivities, in relation to research Transferable (key) skills: Demonstrate an ability to adopt cross-cultural and inter-disciplinary perspectives Communicate relevant concepts and theories effectively and coherently by written and visual means Effectively interpret, analyse and present information Develop library research skills and the ability to use secondary sources in relation to the dissertation Enhance independent self-directed study and learning including time management Appendix 2: Extract from T13172 Dissertation Marking Guidelines This appendix is an extract of the dissertation marking guidelines that will be supplied to internal and external examiners. We have reproduced the proforma examination report form for the empirical and the theoretical type of dissertation. Some examiners may not strictly keep to this format, and the type of dissertation project may require a slightly different type of examination report. The two recommended pro forma Examination Report forms UG Dissertation Essay (Empirical) Examiner s Report Student: Essay Title: Student ID #: Literature review [to be assessed against the following criteria: comprehensive and relevant review of existing literature in the area; a synthesis of material; a critique of the strengths and weaknesses of literature, including methodological weaknesses in the literature; hypotheses/predictions; development of a conceptually and empirically defensible argument leading to the presentation of research aims; good justification and presentation of research question/hypotheses.] Research design [to be assessed against the following criteria: a clear description of method and design; sample, instruments, procedures; appropriate data collection e.g., suitable number of subjects and selection of procedures; justification of techniques; information about the validity & reliability of scales, and so on.] Results [to be assessed against the following criteria: clear description of analytical procedures; appropriate analytical techniques for the particular research question correctly executed; thorough presentation of results; good presentation, i.e., clear, concise and relevant tables and figures.] Discussion [to be assessed against the following criteria: brief summary of main findings; integration of present results with existing literature; discussion of results in relation to the research question/hypotheses developed in the introduction; clear discussion of implications (both theoretical and applied) of the findings; discussion of how what the findings contribute to the general area and the implications for future research or workplace practices; discussion of limitations in the methodology, sample, data analysis.] Overall Integration & Quality of Ideas Additional comments not for students: Marks assigned to each component: Introduction Literature review Method Results Discussion Overall integration and feel  Recommended mark UG Dissertation Essay (Theoretical) Examiner s Report Student: Essay Title: Student ID #: Literature review [to be assessed against the following criteria: comprehensive and relevant review of existing literature in the area; identification of deficiencies in current theory that this analysis will address; demonstration that this theoretical analysis makes a new contribution to thinking; explicitness of assumptions; propositions and research questions derived from the framework show logical adequacy; the relationship between antecedents and consequences is specified.] Research design [to be assessed against the following criteria: outline of hypotheses or research propositions that follow from the theory specifically their empirical (i.e., propositions can be operationalised in such a way that they are falsifiable) and predictive adequacy; description of research design that would enable testing or analysis of those questions, and so on.] Discussion [to be assessed against the following criteria: potential implications of the critique of past theory and the proposed hypotheses, methods and approaches for the empirical testing of the theory or the understanding of the discourse, etc, related to the theory.] Overall Integration & Quality of Ideas Additional comments not for students: Marks assigned to each component: Introduction Literature review Method Discussion Overall integration and feel  Recommended mark Appendix 3: SCCS Basic Guidelines for Referencing[1] References and a full bibliography in the appropriate format are an essential part of the scholarly exercise of writing coursework essays, reports and dissertations. Inadequate, inconsistent or incorrectly formatted referencing will be penalised. Plagiarism Plagiarism is intellectual dishonesty and is unacceptable. The University regards it as a serious academic offence, and penalties include the awarding of a zero mark for the piece of coursework concerned or for the entire module. It can also result in a written warning, suspension or expulsion from your course, or the revoking of the award of your degree. When you hand in your coursework, you are required to sign the cover-sheet declaration confirming that you have read the section relating to plagiarism in the University Regulations and that the essay is your own work. Submission of an electronic form of assignment with or without a coversheet presumes you have read and complied with the regulations. All cases of suspected plagiarism will be reported to the Head of the School for disciplinary action and may be referred to the University Academic Offences Committee. See the Quality Manual section on Academic Offences for details of the procedure (www.nottingham.ac.uk/quality-manual/appeals/offences.htm). Plagiarism is presenting the work of another person as if it were your own. It is plagiarism to quote another writer directly in your coursework without quotation marks  and a reference to the original source, including page numbers. It is also plagiarism to summarise the views of another writer without attribution, even if you use your own words. The important thing is never to let it be thought that you are claiming that a particular view, analysis or opinion is original to you when it is not, and proper referencing will achieve this. Example: This passage on Mao and the Cultural Revolution is a direct quote from Jack Gray, Rebellions and Revolutions (Oxford: OUP, 1990), pp. 378-9: In 1967, after encouraging hopes of a Paris Commune alternative to Party dictatorship, he repudiated the Shanghai Paris Commune established in his name, and insisted on the restoration of Party authority. At the moment of truth he chose the vanguard party. This final failure of nerve provides an a fortiori argument that Marxism-Leninism cannot democratize itself. In your essay you might make a statement like this: Mao s failure to follow through with the implementation of the Paris Commune model in 1967 showed that the socialist system could not democratize itself. This is a paraphrase of a specific argument made by another writer, Jack Gray, and must be footnoted with page numbers as if it were a direct quotation. The same sentence could be rephrased as: As Jack Gray has argued, Mao s failure to follow through ? etc. Provided the passage is footnoted with page numbers that would be full and correct attribution. Anything less could potentially constitute plagiarism. Tutors (lecturers) will check all pieces of coursework for plagiarism. They may use Internet search engines and specialist computer software such as Turnitin  as well as their own knowledge of the source material to do so. SCCS offers a number of modules where assessment is 100% by coursework, and convenors of these modules are particularly vigilant in checking for signs of plagiarism. In most instances plagiarism is obvious to experienced teaching staff; don t take the risk. Do I need to cite page numbers? There are different conventions among the academic disciplines that span the China field. 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