Realizing What is Important

Realizing What is Important

Realizing What is Important: I was watching movies at my friend’s house when I received the news regarding my dad. Halfway through the first movie, a voice shouted down from the top of the stairs, “Susie! You have a phone call!” I picked up the phone and said “Hello?” It was my grandfather. I could hear the distress in his voice when he replied, “Susie, I am coming to pick you up. Your dad has been in an accident.” In “Living Like Weasels,” Annie Dillard uses the analogy of a weasel clinging tenaciously to its prey to express the idea that one should discover that one possession and live toward that one necessity, never letting go”?not even in death (Dillard 126). After obtaining the news regarding my dad, it became obvious that he was my necessity. Even though a person may have many possessions that are valuable to them, one should seek out that one necessity they cannot live without and grasp it, taking full advantage of all its offerings. While waiting for my grandfather, I began to wonder if I would have the opportunity to embrace what I had once ignored. I understood what Dillard meant when she said, “I missed my chance. I should have gone for the throat. I should have lunged for that streak of white under the weasel’s chin and held on, held on for a dearer life” (125). I felt as though I had the chance to cling to my necessity, but I made the decision to let it pass. My mind was racing, there were so many unanswered questions, and I hated how helpless I felt. After waiting for what seemed like an eternity, my grandfather pulled into the driveway. I opened the passenger door and climbed in. He tried to reassure me that everything was going to be okay, but I new better. Finally, we were on our way to Seattle. The ride was quiet except for the faint sound of a Johnny Cash tape softly playing in the background. Several times I attempted to gather my thoughts and make light of the situati…


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