Sexual Harassment Discrimination

Sexual Harassment Discrimination

Sexual Harassment Discrimination Within the workplace there has been a problem that persists even today. With all of the education that today’s companies have done on the subject of sexual harassment, there still seems to be a high number of complaints filed. According to the EEOC, in the year 2002 they’re where 14,396 complaints filed for a total of $50.3 million dollars. While the number was lower then the year before, it was not lowered enough. Sexual harassment, by law, consists of deliberate and unwelcome sexual advances, unwanted request for sexual favors, and certain other offensive conduct of a sexual nature. Sexual harassment may be committed by men or women in many different roles, such as that of boss, client, co-worker, or teacher. However, a large majority of cases involves the harassment of women by their male bosses or fellow employees. By its nature, it involves the most embarrassing and intimate of details. Sexual harassment usually consists of someone doing and or saying offensive things. Investigations into claims of sexual harassment as well as victims and witnesses must be treated while promoting full disclosure of improper conduct and prompt resolution of valid complaints. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 made sexual discrimination in the workplace illegal. According to the EEOC guidelines, behavior that is considered sexual harassment exists when one of the three elements is present: Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. Employers have a duty to maintain a working environment free of harassment. Employers are liable for harassment by supervisors regardless of whether the employer knew or should have known of the harassment. Employers are responsible for acts of harassment by co-workers where the employer or supervisor knew or should have known of the conduct and failed to take immediate and corrective action feasible to the…


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