Society in Huck Finn

Society in Huck Finn

In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, there are several characters that mature and develop throughout the novel. Jim and Huck are examples of this; however, Tom Sawyer is not. Tom exemplifies consistency, as his juvenile character remains the same throughout the novel. His immaturity is his most notable characteristic, and his very na?Ÿ??ve perception of life demonstrates this quality. Tom Sawyer is a name that is almost synonymous with adventure and mischief. His excitement-seeking personality in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer was not left behind in the sequel, and Twain did not take much time to show this. “Tom whispered to me and wanted to tie Jim up to a tree,” says Huck after he snuck out of the house to be with Tom. Rather than just leaving the premises, Tom decides he wants to have some fun with Jim. Risking getting caught, he sneaks back into the house to get candles and then puts Jim’s hat on a tree in an attempt to fool him. This is the first sign of Tom’s disrespect for Jim. The second sign occurs near the end of the book. In this instance, Tom devises an elaborate scheme to free Jim out of bondage in the Phelps’s shack. Instead of sneaking him out as quickly as possible, the plan requires several days to arrange. Huck and Jim agree to this only because it seems as though Tom is genuinely trying to help Jim by dedicating much effort and time to saving him. However, later on it is revealed that Tom has fooled them both. Jim has been a free slave for quite some time, as Miss Watson died and freed him in her will. The only reason Tom was helping to free Jim was for his own amusement. His elaborate scheme, which included Jim’s incarceration with snakes and rats, was formed for selfish reasons only, with no intentions of helping Jim at all. This great disrespect for Jim is an example of how little Tom values life. He plays with Jim as he would a toy, saying “There ain’t necessity enough in this case;…


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