Statewide salary rates in public schools

Statewide salary rates in public schools

Statewide Salary Rates in Public Schools: Pros and Cons Having a statewide salary schedule will benefit those inner city and rural school districts, which have a lower tax base. This would allow them to attract qualified candidates on par with wealthier school districts. It would also benefit H.R. departments statewide, because it would greatly simplify the recruitment/selection process. It would also be much easier to develop a compensation plan, without the pressures of inter-district competition. Consequently, there will be less emphasis on determining an appropriate labor market. Such a salary schedule also has an inherent equitable component, which is that of equal pay for equal work. Also, there will be no pressure on candidates to relocate, in order to work in a better-paying school. Finally, all employees would benefit because, with salary being equal statewide, the only way for districts to compete for candidates, would be by offering better benefits. This benefit “war” will improve the absolute benefit levels of all employees. The negative aspects of a statewide salary schedule focus on performance appraisals, the watering-down of talent in traditionally excellent districts, and on causing reactive school districts. Unless the performance appraisal systems have a very strong merit increase component, it would eliminate the motivation for teachers to excel. A statewide salary schedule will greatly hurt school district with a higher tax base. It would be unfair for those residents, who will end up paying higher taxes, and will be rewarded by a decreased delivery of education for their children in those schools. Schools in wealthy districts will no longer be able to take their pick of the best candidates. This may cause a watering-down of teacher talent. H.R. departments will become more reactive, instead of proactive, in a system without competition. In summary, a statewide salary schedule will …


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