Statute and Case Law Relationship

Statute and Case Law Relationship

The following paper is a brief summary of employment law cases pertaining to religion, national origin, age and race. The summaries contain explanations between the case and the statute or regulation pertaining to them. Each examines how the regulations have evolved pertaining to the individual cases and how they impact the emplacement environment. Religion Under Title VII, employers are prohibited from, discriminating against individuals because of their religion in hiring, firing, and other terms and conditions of employment. The Act also requires employers to reasonably accommodate the religious practices of an employee or prospective employee, unless to do so would create an undue hardship upon the employer (see also 29 CFR l605). (Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, 2002) In a case concerning religious belief and employer code of conduct, the issue was raised on whether the employer did enough to accommodate the employee’s religious beliefs. Under Lawson v. Washington State Patrol, the employee argued that he was not given a reasonable accommodation for his beliefs as a Jehovah Witness and instead was constructively discharged. When Lawson started cadet basic training to become a trooper for the Washington State Patrol he was given a manual on Procedures, Rules, and Regulations. In this manual it states cadets are to “assemble for flag formations [twice daily] unless otherwise assigned” (Opinion Brief, 2001). Even though Lawson did make two voluntary attempts to salute the flag, he felt he could no longer comprise his beliefs. His faith tells him that he is not to salute the flag of any state or nation. At this point, he felt he had no choice but to resign since the manual policy stated those who deviate from this rule are subject to disciple that could include termination (Opinion Brief, 2001). Before he resigned, he went to at least three different higher ranking officials to explain his situation. Lawson a…


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