SugarCRM Implementation Project By The A-Team  Fo Assignment Assistance

SugarCRM Implementation Project By The A-Team  Fo Assignment Assistance

Course Project RGR Prototype Vehicle Risk & Quality Management Introduction The purpose of the project is to apply and demonstrate objectives learned in MBA7173 Risk and Quality Management class. To do this, we have developed the fictitious company called RGR Vehicles LLC and applied the scenario of receiving a customer contract to provide a prototype vehicle to the client. RGR Vehicles is a small, specialty vehicles development company. They develop medium duty trucks for military, industrial, and commercial applications. The company already has several, previously designed, off-the-shelf vehicles that they can re-engineer to customer specifications to fit almost any application. RGR Vehicles consists of a development center in southeastern Michigan with areas for engineering, design, purchasing, fabrication, build shop, and testing departments. They are fully capable of providing fully tested one-off vehicle designs from this facility. They also own a specialty vehicle manufacturing plant. If the customer approves the prototype design, RGR will provide assistance to put the vehicle into production at the customer s facility, RGR s manufacturing plant, or a third party assembler. Project Overview RGR Vehicle has just received a firm-fixed-price contract from a customer to provide them with one prototype vehicle for their evaluation. The customer has provided detailed specifications and thorough requirements for the required vehicle as well as timing for delivery. The project will consist of RGR using one of their base vehicle designs and re-engineering it to the customer s specifications. They will then purchase components, fabricate, and build one sample vehicle in their shop. The testing department will do a pre-test break-in drive, then test the vehicle to validate that it meets all customer requirements. Upon test completion, the vehicle will be refurbished and delivered to the client. Project Methodology RGR Vehicles has developed a full project plan for this endeavor including background, scope, stakeholder responsibilities, project life cycle, tasks, conditions, assumptions, work breakdown structure, detailed schedule, cost spending plan, configuration management plan, project data management plan, verification plan, skills needs assessment, infrastructure requirements, risk management plan, quality assessment, variance limits, reporting structure, issue management, and progress reporting. However, for purposes of brevity and keeping on the class topics, only the project scope, risk, and quality items will be presented here. Risk Management Plan RGR Vehicle takes project risk very seriously. Project risk is defined by the Project Management Institute as an uncertain event or condition that, if it occurs, has a positive or negative effect on a project s objectives  (PMI, 2000). RGR s risk management plan consists of all process from discovering risk to the closing of recognized risks. The company goes through four phases of risk analysis: risk identification, qualitative/quantitative risk analysis, risk response planning, risk monitoring and control. RGR will use the Risk Register as the primary document for all risk activities. The Risk Register will be located in the project s SharePoint repository with controlled access for all project stakeholders. A copy of the Risk Register is included in the appendix of this report. Risk Identification The project manager (PM) has the first responsibility in risk identification, but must involve every stakeholder on the project in the process. The project manager should begin by reviewing and considering problems that have occurred on similar projects in the past and determine if the same problems should be considered risks on the current project. This will be followed by a risk identification meeting where lists of common risks are reviewed and specific project risks discussed. This meeting is run as a brainstorming session with all stakeholders present to detect all risks on the project. The PM will also sent out emails with questionnaires to prominent subject matter experts (SMI) as a Delphi technique to undercover specific risk areas. This additional step eliminates bias in the process because members have no pressure to sway them one way or another  (Heldman 2005). All risks identified under these three methods are listed on the Risk Register. Other risk analysis techniques have used risk submission forms and risk planning templates, but RGR has found these to be a duplication of effort. All risk activities: identification, analysis, response planning, and monitoring, are done with one common document. The Risk Register is then available to all stakeholders and used by the PM and risk owner for risk control. Qualitative and Quantitative Risk Analysis Once the list of risks has been made on the Risk Register, the PM, along with the company SME s assign a risk owner to each risk. The PM then discusses with each risk owner to develop a qualitative analysis for each risk. Each risk is rated High (H), Medium (M), or Low (L) for probability of occurrence on the Risk Register. Additionally, each category of Schedule, Cost, Quality, Safety, and Scope is rated H, M, of L for level of impact. The descriptions shown in Table 1-1 can be used by the risk owner for assessment. Probability Low Low Medium Medium Medium High High Unlikely Unlikely Likely Likely Likely Almost Certain Almost Certain Impacts Low Low Medium Medium Medium High High Schedule No Impact to Critical Path or Field Work No Impact to Critical Path or Field Work Potential to Affect Critical Path or Field Work Potential to Affect Critical Path or Field Work Potential to Affect Critical Path or Field Work Certain to Affect Critical Path or Field Work Certain to Affect Critical Path or Field Work Cost Less Than$ 100,000 $ 100,000 to$ 500,000 Greater Than$ 500,000 Quality Minor impact to product deliverables Minor impact to product deliverables Moderate impact to product deliverables Moderate impact to product deliverables Moderate impact to product deliverables Major impact to product deliverables Major impact to product deliverables Safety No Impact to worker safety No Impact to worker safety Minor impact to worker safety Minor impact to worker safety Minor impact to worker safety Major impact to worker safety Major impact to worker safety Scope < 1% < 1% 2% to 5% 2% to 5% 2% to 5% > 5% > 5% Table 1-1, Qualitative risk assessment Quantitative risk analysis is done automatically by formulas and conditional formatting within the Risk register template as seen Table 1-2. Each H, M, L, receives a numerical value: H=5, M=3, and L=1. The overall risk level is then calculated by the formula: Total Score = (Schedule + Cost + Quality + Safety + Scope) x Likelihood. The Risk Register displays a total score between 5 and 125. Each risk is then automatically labeled Red, Yellow, or Green by the method: Red >75, Yellow 40 to 74, and Green less than 40. Once all risks have qualitative and quantitative analysis complete, the PM can sort risks and prioritize them by sorting the excel sheet on the total score column that will bring the important ones to the top. Risk Assessment Level High = 5 Medium = 3 Low = 1 Total Score = (Schedule + Cost + Quality + Safety + Scope) x Likelihood Table 1-2, Risk assessment level Risk Response Planning The next step in the risk management plan is response planning. This is the process of deciding what actions to take to reduce threats (Heldman 2000). The PM assigns the risk owner to complete columns K through M on the Risk Register (see Risk Register in attachments). Every event in life has certain signs that they are about to take place. This is described in column K: Risk Event Triggers. What are the conditions, actions, or events that are likely to trigger the risk event to occur or is a leading indicator to the risk event occurring? Column L will detail the risk Response/ Mitigation Strategy. What action(s) will be taken to limit the likelihood of the risk occurring or limiting the impacts? These plans are to be put in place before the risk happens. Then, if the risk event actually occurs, column M describes the Contingency Plan: What actions will be taken if the risk event occurs? Risk Monitoring and Control The risk owner is fully responsible for the plans of the risk response. The Risk Register also contains space for comments on each risk for the risk owner to use for further explanation of actions to take during risk monitoring and control. If he needs more space to detail out a complex plan, he does this separately, refers to it, and then summarizes it in the Risk Register. As the project matures, it is fully up to the risk owner to drive implementation of these plans. The risk is his; he manages it, and reports directly to the PM. Risk monitoring and control is directed by the PM, facilitated by the risk owners, yet is the responsibility of every one of the project stakeholders. Risks are regularly reviewed at project status meetings. The PM will decide himself what level of risk he is willing to work with on the project. This tells him how far down the prioritized list he will require detailed response plans from the risk owners. Some low scoring risks the PM may decide to accept with no plans, while some medium level risks may need to be just watched. The highest-level risks may sometimes require daily meeting to assess and revise plans. This control falls fully on the PM since it is his responsibility for success of the project. Risk Management through Schedule Management Tools As identified in our risk register, many of the more common and reoccurring project risks can impact project schedules, and or cost. Some of these risks can also be managed or prevented by scheduling management tools and techniques. To list a few of those more common risks that can be managed by appropriate schedule management techniques, include timely management decisions, component design and subsequent changes that cause delays, and inadequate resources (staff or budget). One suggested tool from this course project, for managing or preventing negative project risk, is the Network Diagram . The network diagram also referred to as PERT (Project Evaluation and Review Techniques) diagram, shows the logical relationships of the project activities, as seen in Figure 1. Figure 1, Network diagram chart These diagrams are an output of the activity sequencing process (6.2) and an input to schedule development (6.4), (PMPOK, 2004). Another and separate reference states that network diagrams shows path convergence, helping to better analyze (and prevent) risk to cost and timing of tasks, (parkland.edu, 2014). A great use for this tool is in addressing the risk of late management decisions. A high level project network or project schedule overview and milestone chart, can help management see the importance of making scope, trade-off, and budget decision in a timely manner, avoiding critical delay impacts to downstream project deliverables and milestones. Although network diagrams are a proven analysis tool, providing a means for project timing reference and detailed activity interfaces, more applicable tools are used for government prototype shops, focusing more on estimates of resource effort and usage levels in comparison to availabilities and budgeted resource. In other words, although important, risk seen in experienced prototype development shops, is not so much found in a complicated network of tasks, its critical path, and the subsequent Network Diagram , but instead in task estimates of effort and cost, and resource levels, as they relate to budget and schedule risk. One reason for this may be the government normally works with experienced prototype shops and provide a set/required sequence of milestone deliverables, where path convergence and relationship (handoffs) are somewhat straightforward. Contracts are made up of numerous straightforward deliverables that include many documents, numerous meetings, and product development phases timed by the Government s set of project milestones. These government milestones take place throughout the project performance timeline and pace all activities involved. Governments and suppliers then put more emphases on management tools that are more applicable to managing budget and other schedule risk (as further discussed below). The method of choice or tool used for cost and scheduling in is called Earned Value Management System (EVMS). EVMS does of course include the use of a critical path methodology, but as mentioned above the emphasis is not on assessing the resulting network diagram and task convergence, but instead an assessment of month period spending, resources usage, and availabilities. An analysis of initial estimates of resource effort required to implement scope deliverables over the set performance period and milestones can help identify where resource challenges (manpower, schedule, or budge) or potential scheduling errors need to be resolved. Resolving these concerns up front in the planning phase is the initial step in an ongoing process of risk management through schedule management. Once schedule, budget and resource concerns are addressed (they meet acceptable and expected levels within scope, budget, and timing requirements), the planned cost and schedule baseline can be established. It is the ongoing (monthly) assessment of this baseline that allows the project manager and team members (task owners) to make process or planning adjustments, preventing or mitigating future risk of unrecoverable budget overruns and or schedule delays. The monthly EVMS analysis involves assessing actual planned effort performed (earned value) as compared to both effort planned (schedule) and actual spending. Effort planned is referred to as budget cost of work scheduled, (BCWS). Actual planned work performed (earned value) is referred to as budgeted cost of work performed, (BCWP). Actual spending is referred to as actual cost of work performed, (ACWP). Comparing both the planned schedule and actual spending numbers to what planed work actual took place (earned value), results is variances (in dollars) that must be addressed and documented, if the variances is outside of a 5% threshold, (Humphreys & Associates, 2014). Again, addressing variance can mitigate or prevent future risks. See Figure 2 and Figure 3 for examples of an EVMS graph and report chart, respectively. Figure 2, EVMS graph Figure 3, EVMS report chart The government uses other steps in the EVMS process to prevent risk, in this case, those resulting in poor project estimates. First, the government strongly considers past performance as part of their contract award selection. Inexperienced companies, those that have a history of overruns, late delivery, or terminated contracts due to poor performance, are not likely to be selected. Therefore contractors in the running are experienced, have a good past performance for managing projects, and are expected to have a good basis for the contract estimates, or basis of estimate (BOE). Second, these experienced prototype contract shops are required to provide documented BOEs by a provided specific detailed work breakdown structure (WBS), captured over different performance time periods. This includes a rational  for each BOE explaining any scalability factors (adjustments due to differences, e.g., technology or size) used in comparing work to past-performed efforts. A final risk prevention application of schedule and project management processes, discussed here, is resource planning. Although this process looks across all projects and is owned outside of anyone particular project manage it is a concern that can effect each and every project. It is not unusual for prototype shops to take on more than they can handle, saying yes to corporate requests or customers, over extending available resources. Just like budget and financing, any project that draws on a shared resources pool, needs to prevent the risk of not having the needed resources to perform. The process discussed here uses the monthly resource estimates, from all projects, during the next calendar year. This includes project that are using EVMS or less rigorous projects such as internal research projects, and then compares them to available resources. It includes man-hour efforts by each resource type on projects, and other costs of material, subcontract services, and travel by functional areas, as seen in the project resource sheet in Figure 4. Figure 4, Project resource worksheet Some companies (management) make the huge mistake of focusing on the top line of project demand and available resources: We have a fairly consistent total program demand for around 180 people throughout the upcoming coming year and 200 employee onsite, so all is good.  Is this correct? No, they have to consider the availabilities of the appropriate skill sets and to be applied when they are needed. As can be seen from the staffing example in Figure 5, potential risk of manpower shortages as well as surplus (those not being used) can be identified. Figure 5, Staffing analysis chart Not having the skilled personnel levels needed will most likely delay projects, cause chaos, possibly increase project cost (recovery), poor quality, poor performance and /loss of future customers. I can t build a vehicle if I don t have mechanics, design without designers, or develop the suspension without chassis engineers. The appropriate personnel needs to be onsite, trained, and ready to work as planned. With surpluses, keeping a large amount of personnel on board with no projects to work on and place to charge, will use up area budgets and cost the company inefficiencies and money. Both can lead to project cancelation/sunk cost, as seen in the staffing analysis chart in Figure 5. This staffing resource plan then becomes a decision tool for management. If large amounts of individual resources types are short over long periods (say designers), then decisions need to be made on adjusting when some projects should start or not doing them all together (if possible), or hiring the needed personnel. If large amounts of personnel types are not being utilized for long periods (as in the example chart) then management needs to consider taking on more projects, if in the budget. They could also look for financing or contracts that would cover the personnel and project expense. Finally, and normally as a last resort, management may need to decide to layoff personnel before underutilized resources have used up all the available department budget. The same can be said about the subsequent spending plan. Given a budget to spend, sometimes the engineering prototype shop just wants to start working making the assumptions that they can work research projects along with some paying contracts and not look at the overall budget picture. The spending chart shows the results of all projects planned for the coming year and considers only cost covered internally, while showing a 14 million budget limit. Nevertheless, as can be seen on the spending analysis chart in Figure 6, planned project costs total to well above this mark, and reach $14M (run out of budget) by July. Figure 6, Spending analysis chart Management can use this analysis to make decisions from the get go avoiding cancellations after project start and subsequent sunk cost. As mentioned earlier, they could also look for funding, etc. Bottom line, the best thing for the company, its employees, all projects involved, and customers is that an organization best matches it resources to project efforts, fully and effectively, -minimizing risks so success, reward and company sustainability can be maximized. Quality Assurance RGR vehicles LLC, is developing a prototype based on the customer requirements. Based on the request of the customer the company is using and RGR original vehicle configuration and redesigning it based on the customer specifications and requirements. By using the original vehicle configuration, the company can use parts with good quality design elements that have been used for long periods for numerous vehicles. With these activities, it is possible to reduce the development resources, cutting the design cost, stabilize the quality, and reduce the plant space and number of spare parts. The prototype vehicle, which is designed and built as per the requirements of the customer, will be done through a strict quality assurance process. The quality assurance process examines the vehicle (product) right from the input specifications to the vehicle design outputs through each function of engineer/design, procure, build and test the prototype vehicle. The process of quality assurance includes: Quality Assurance for the components: components such as suspension parts, engines, transmission are thoroughly checked to ensure the quality of the product. RGR has developed a rigorously followed process called Receiving Inspection  through which each part, whether purchased from a supplier, or fabricated in house, is subjected to. See the appendix for a copy of the Receiving Inspection Process. When a vehicle is developed from its existing original vehicle application, it is necessary to familiarize yourself with the properties of the new material. It is necessary to understand how it will behave under certain conditions like handling loads. Therefore, the existing test loads, which are used for the original vehicles, are no longer appropriate and new designs or new material should be developed for the new ones. All new materials, parts, and components are subjected to a comprehensive computer based Finite Element Analysis (FEA) engineering process. Conducting technical quality assurance testing for small components, assemblies and individual parts to ensure they are designed and built to withstand the requirement based test conditions in laboratory testing. Collecting, entering, manipulating and analyzing the data with computer-based simulations that accommodate statistical needs and requirements. Additionally, design verification plan and reports (DVP&R) regarding various operational aspects of the vehicle testing during shakedown, break in and performance tests are fully documented and analyzed. Ensuring the build and manufacturing process comply with the customer requirement standards and using a total quality management process shat RGR uses called In-Process Inspection . See the appendix for a copy of the In-Process Inspection process. The advantage of conducting the quality assurance is that it can save cost and shorten the design, build and test cycle time while ensuring the highest possible quality. Process Improvement Plan The process improvement plan focuses on continual improvement ensuring throughout better quality of the product. In order to ensure better quality of the product, the company should ensure every function right from development to delivery, which includes implementation, engineering, testing and manufacturing processes. The RGR vehicles company already has taken numerous necessary actions in process improvement. In the future, for a company to ensure better quality control it would suggest some necessary actions when it undergoes process improvement. First, in the manufacturing phase, ensure that all the parts of the vehicle are consistent during the actual production run. Second, when the company releases the product (vehicle), it will be tested to find out the weakness, mechanical problems, and other details that could be improved. These testing procedures should be recorded and documented to find out the exact quality of the product is in this testing phase. Third, the prototype vehicle should go through a sampling inspection where series of specific confirmation tests are performed, with predetermined aspects analyzed to ensure the current unit meets the customer requirements. Fourth, is vehicle inspection, it goes through a complete series of quality verification process to make sure that a range of dynamic, functional quality standards is met. These checks include body, engine, brakes, chassis, and almost every aspect of the vehicle performance. Fifth, is analysis that provides data that helps company to maintain quality approach to all the completed prototyped vehicles. Appendix I Appendix II Appendix III Appendix IV PROJECT SCOPE STATEMENT Project Name: Prototype Vehicle Development Prepared by: G. Robb Date (MM/DD/YYYY): 12/16/2014 Version History (Insert rows as needed.): Version History (Insert rows as needed.): Version History (Insert rows as needed.): Version Date (MM/DD/YYYY) Comments 1.0 11/09/2014 Initial draft 1.1 12/13/2014 Final revision 1. Executive Summary (Scope Statement) 1. Executive Summary (Scope Statement) Provide below a brief overview of this project (for example, project purpose and justification): Provide below a brief overview of this project (for example, project purpose and justification): > Engineer/Design, procure, build and test prototype vehicle to customer requirements and specifications. This project is a generic example used for performing risk and quality management for MBA 7173 Project Risk and Quality Management class at LTU. In request of a customer, the company will start its original vehicle application and reconfigure it to customer requirements and specifications. One prototype vehicle will be built. The vehicle will then undergo shakedown, break-in and performance testing before delivery to the customer. > Engineer/Design, procure, build and test prototype vehicle to customer requirements and specifications. This project is a generic example used for performing risk and quality management for MBA 7173 Project Risk and Quality Management class at LTU. In request of a customer, the company will start its original vehicle application and reconfigure it to customer requirements and specifications. One prototype vehicle will be built. The vehicle will then undergo shakedown, break-in and performance testing before delivery to the customer. Information in the project summary area was developed during the project concept phase (Project Charter) and should be included here. Provide a link to the Project Charter for reference. (No Charter provided) Link_to_Project_Charter Note: In any instance in which there is a discrepancy between the Project Charter and the Project Scope Statement, the latter is considered authoritative. Note: In any instance in which there is a discrepancy between the Project Charter and the Project Scope Statement, the latter is considered authoritative. 2. Business Objectives 2. Business Objectives 2.1: Product Description (Solution): > Customer specified prototype vehicle and performance data > Customer specified prototype vehicle and performance data > Provide prototype vehicle to customer on time and within budget. Project will utilize company s engineering, design, supply chain, vehicle build shop, and testing service at a cost acceptable to the customer while providing the company adequate profit. > Provide prototype vehicle to customer on time and within budget. Project will utilize company s engineering, design, supply chain, vehicle build shop, and testing service at a cost acceptable to the customer while providing the company adequate profit. 3. Project Description 3. Project Description For each of the following areas, provide sufficient detail to define this project adequately: For each of the following areas, provide sufficient detail to define this project adequately: 3.1: Project Scope 3.1: Project Scope ? Includes (list Deliverables): One prototype vehicle, performance test data for modified systems > > ? Does Not Include: Vehicle durability testing data, Design TDP drawings, Production feasibility, future development support > > 3.2: Project Completion Criteria: Deliver the customer a complete vehicle at their location, along with performance test data passing all requirement specifications > > 3.3: External Dependencies: The company will use outside; proven suppliers for material procurement, outside testing services may be used. > > 3.4: Assumptions: Customer provides detailed vehicle specifications that are achievable within the capabilities of a current vehicle design modified for requirements. 3.5: Constraints: Must base vehicle assumptions on currently designed vehicle with modification within scope of modifications, timing must be within reasonable industry standards. > > 4. Project Milestones 4. Project Milestones 4.1: Estimated Schedules Key project milestones relative to project start are as follows: (Insert rows as needed.) 4.1: Estimated Schedules Key project milestones relative to project start are as follows: (Insert rows as needed.) Project Milestone Target Date (MM/DD/YYYY) £ Project Start £ Design Release £ Procurement start £ Vehicle build complete £ Vehicle Shakedown complete £ Vehicle Break-in complete £ Testing complete £ Project Complete 5. Project Approach 5. Project Approach 5. Project Approach 5. Project Approach 5.1: Primary Plans: Will the project have formal written plans such as project schedule, budget, quality, risk, and so on? Describe briefly in the following space: 5.1: Primary Plans: Will the project have formal written plans such as project schedule, budget, quality, risk, and so on? Describe briefly in the following space: 5.1: Primary Plans: Will the project have formal written plans such as project schedule, budget, quality, risk, and so on? Describe briefly in the following space: 5.1: Primary Plans: Will the project have formal written plans such as project schedule, budget, quality, risk, and so on? Describe briefly in the following space: 5.2: Scheduled Status Meetings (Insert rows as needed.) 5.2: Scheduled Status Meetings (Insert rows as needed.) 5.2: Scheduled Status Meetings (Insert rows as needed.) 5.2: Scheduled Status Meetings (Insert rows as needed.) Meeting Purpose Purpose Frequency Project Team Review issues, progress Review issues, progress Weekly Design Review Review design Review design Weekly, until release Build Review Review build progress Review build progress Daily, 10 min build start mtg. during build Test Status Review test progress, issues Review test progress, issues Weekly 5.3: Scheduled Status Reports (Insert rows as needed.) 5.3: Scheduled Status Reports (Insert rows as needed.) 5.3: Scheduled Status Reports (Insert rows as needed.) 5.3: Scheduled Status Reports (Insert rows as needed.) Report Purpose Purpose Frequency Meeting Minutes Document all meeting in repository Document all meeting in repository After each meeting Build Book Document vehicle parts, assembly Document vehicle parts, assembly Complete at finish of build Vehicle Test Data Document vehicle testing results Document vehicle testing r


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