The art of cubism

The art of cubism

The art of Cubism Cubism, a name suggested by Henri Mattise, was the beginning of an era, which ended artistic tradition. The use of the unprecedented colour was liked by many and dislike by others. It acquired the derogative name “Fauvism’ which was used to mock the lack of form that cubist paintings were believed to have. Cubism was initiated between 1907 and 1910 and only ended when the 1st world war began. The key concept of cubism was to capture the essence of an object by showing it from multiple viewpoints. Therefore it disowned the conventions that had governed western paintings for more than 5 centuries. When looking at cubist paintings, you can instantly see that the flat two- dimensional surface of a plane has been empathised, and the traditional techniques of perspective, foreshortening, modelling and chiaroscuro have purposely been abandoned. This abandonment of the normal conventions presented a new reality in depicting radically fragmented objects, whose several sides are seen simultaneously. Cubism was believed to distrust and disrupt “whole’ images, which are perceived by the eye, these images were considered artificial and too conventional. By recognising that, perspectival space is an illusory, rational invention, cubism seeked to reproduce an object with an amalgamation of perspectives, likely to be seen by the mind’s eye. This was an attempt to mimic the power of the mind in synthesising abstract images and creating a new world. Cubism was broken down into two stages, the first being Analytical cubism. This period was from 1910-1912. Paintings were executed in monochromatic palettes of grey, brown and light traces of ochre, black and green, in order, not to distract the viewer from the artist’s primary interests which was”? ” The structure of form itself’. This array of colour was suited to the presentation of complete, multiple views of an object that was reduced to the overlapping…


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