The biggotry of 12 angry men

The biggotry of 12 angry men

The absence of stereotyping and prejudice in society is very rare although not as rare in the last quarter of a century. The 1957 motion picture “12 Angry Men” was far ahead of its time than probably was thought at its inception. The movie displays how prejudice, stereotyping, racism and other behaviors that hinder communication could lead to catastrophic results. This movie, although made forty years ago, has allowed me to take a step back and analyze how I judge the people around me. Individuals should be given more credit than face value and we should think about decisions we make instead of going with the flow. There are many examples of noise in the film. The examples of internal noise are not heard or displayed in the film but by the reaction of the actors you could easily tell that there is some internal noise going on in the heads of the jurors. At one point when juror number three goes off on how rotten kids are, the cameras just shows him thinking hard. That has got to be some serious internal noise in his head. The stand of juror number eight to vote not guilty alone, initially, had to of created internal noise among the jurors just because at that point they knew that the case was not going to be open and shut. The examples of external noise are more obvious for obvious reasons. The yelling and arguing that goes should be considered loud external noise. When juror number nine tries to make points other jurors talk over his timid voice. The rain outside is external noise. Any stimulus heard in that jury room is an example of external noise. There are also examples of semantic noise. The bias comments, stereotyping, and prejudice that were displayed in the film are all examples of semantic noise. The preconceived notions that the jurors had were blocking the imperfections in what seemed to be and open and shut guilty verdict. All jurors except one were blinded by their own everyday lives and almost …


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