The Dying of the Light

The Dying of the Light

The Dying of the Light Every human possesses an overmastering compulsion to survive. However with the development of modern man, this inherent drive has been tamed through the likes of religion, philosophy, and despair, allowing people to freely accept death. Dylan Thomas for one has recognized this growing problem and through his poem “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” he reminds us how important our will to live is. Utilizing powerful metaphors, the speaker sends out an urgent plea that we should never accept death hands down. The metaphors in stanza 3 deals with men who have deep regret over the lives they’ve led. Stanza 3 addresses good men, who in lines 7 and 8, “cry how brightly their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay”. These are men whose accomplishments, when measured against the grand scheme of things, amount to nothing. For that reason, they mourn over what they could have done. These men are faced with despair, feeling regret over the lives they’ve led, but are incapable of reliving them. Casting away their laments, these men fight furiously against death in hopes of repenting for their lives. Through this metaphor a tone of urgency is established, as we are hastened to take action before our lives pass us by and it’s too late. Furthermore by relating to the feelings of these good men, we realize the dangers of living in would’ve, could’ve, and should’ve mindsets, inspiring us to live wholeheartedly by accepting the paths we’ve chosen. The fifth stanza contains probably the most dynamic metaphor in this poem. On lines 14-15, the speaker addresses men who have little time left in the world, “grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight, blind eyes that could blaze like meteors and be gay”. This metaphor is describing a feeling that all men near death experience. The feeling the speaker is trying to describe is that of Meursault’s the day before his execution, where alth…


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