The Elizabethan theatre

The Elizabethan theatre

The Elizabethan Theater The Elizabethan times were a progression for the world of theater. Named after Queen Elizabeth I of England, the entertainment industry formed its foundation from this period. These times were not only remembered for the plays, but for the physical attributes of the theater itself. The facilities, structure, and arrangement of the theater really characterized this time period. The first thing that is important to realize about the structure of these playhouses is that they were usually built on marsh ground. The theatres varied in size and usually seated somewhere between two and three thousand people. The theater had a valuable heavy oak framework. This wood was durable, and had been responsible for the standing of some theatres. Although, building the theaters out of this wood also had its flaws; Most of the theaters were circular in form, which made it difficult to construct these buildings using the wood. Also, some of the theaters were lost due to rotting wood as well as natural disasters, like fires and rain. It is safe to say that building the Elizabethan Theaters was not an easy job, but it definitely made for an interesting building. All of the horizontal beams in the frame forming the inner and outer walls were cut by hand to the requisite curve out of balks or timber far heavier than the finished members. Most of the theaters like the most famous of all, The Globe, where many of Shakesphere’s plays were performed, usually had an octagonal frame. At the end of this era, most of the galleries ended up being converted into spectator galleries enclosing a portion of the playhouses yard. The entrances were built narrow so that the incoming spectators would be forced to walk in a single file line. At the main door there was a doorman who held a box which each person who entered would drop a penny i…


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