The Garden of Love

The Garden of Love

The Garden of Love Falling out of love can be described as one word: depressing. It’s not hard coming back to reality after being swept off your feet by the most beautiful girl in the world. William Blake expressed this through his poem. Set in “The Garden of Love” in 1794, you come across a young man who is walking by the garden and becomes fascinated. As you read on, you notice some things about the “garden.” You notice that there is a Chapel that was built on a field where he used to play on as a child. Where the flowers were originally supposed to be, he found tombstones instead and priests in their black gowns engaged in their services. The poem, consisting of 3 stanzas, had an original rhyme scheme that was apparent in all of poems before 1880 but it didn’t contain a sonnet. It was a literal poem that described what had become of his Church ground. While reading the poem, you begin to notice some things about the character. You realize that this was a middle-aged man that was once in love. His heart feels dead from losing the love of his life, hence, “the tombstones where the flowers used to be.” 2 While walking through the “garden” he feels like he is at home because “the garden” experienced pain and mistreatment, as well. He notices that not only have the tombstones replaced the flowers, but, it has replaced the entire “garden” and this can also be related to how his heart is filled with sorrow from the lose. The Chapel was closed down with a sign on the door that said, “Thou shall not,” explaining how he didn’t want his love to end but there was really nothing he can do about it. There was no dialogue in the poem and the diction was filled with imagery like, for example, the tombstones where the flowers should be, Priests with their black gowns, and the Chapel on the midst of green. There were conflicts in the poem. One was of man vs. himself because you notice how bad h…


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