The impact of dissociation on the therapeutic relationship between client and therapist. Essay Researchpaper Help

The impact of dissociation on the therapeutic relationship between client and therapist. Essay Researchpaper Help

Assignment One: Manuscript for Professional Publication Course: EDUC 919 Professional Writing and Research Instructor: Michelle J. Barthlow Possible Points: 200 Overview: As a doctoral student and teaching professional you are encouraged to publish in scholarly journals. One of the responsibilities of holding an advanced degree is to be a leader in your field. The best way to accomplish that goal is to be published. Requirements: Based on your dissertation topic, write a literature review  to be submitted to peer-reviewed journal. The article should be thought provoking and have a unique perspective or insight into a current educational topic. The manuscript should be original and firmly grounded and supported by research. Do not just regurgitate existing literature. Unlike your Dissertation s Literature review, a journal article literature review synthesizes the literature and is succinct and to the point. Begin by identifying the topic area and its importance to the educational field. Green, Johnson and Adams describe a literature review as a type of research article published in a professional peer-reviewed journal. The purpose of a literature review is to objectively report the current knowledge on a topic and base this summary on previously published research. A literature review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview and helps place that information into perspective.  Source: http://www.lib.ucdavis.edu/dept/instruc/files/finding-literature-reviews.pdf Helpful Hints: 1) Log into the LU Library and search the keywords literature review and education  in the LU Library to get an idea of what a literature review article looks like. 2) Review the following websites: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:jfzU7p9E1fQJ:https://roanoke.edu/Documents/sociology/Guidelines_Writing_Literature_Review.doc+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html Rubric Rubric Rubric Scale Scale Scale Scale Scale Scale The Letter: The student wrote a professional business letter addressed to the editor. The Letter: The student wrote a professional business letter addressed to the editor. The Letter: The student wrote a professional business letter addressed to the editor. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P The Guidelines: The student provided the name of the journal and submission guidelines. The Guidelines: The student provided the name of the journal and submission guidelines. The Guidelines: The student provided the name of the journal and submission guidelines. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P The Article: Student wrote a quality and well-crafted article for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The Article: Student wrote a quality and well-crafted article for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. The Article: Student wrote a quality and well-crafted article for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P The student wrote a short introduction section that explored the general topic and its importance to the field. The student wrote a short introduction section that explored the general topic and its importance to the field. The student wrote a short introduction section that explored the general topic and its importance to the field. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P The student s review provided a thorough overview of previous research on the topic using a minimum of 8 high quality sources. The student s review provided a thorough overview of previous research on the topic using a minimum of 8 high quality sources. The student s review provided a thorough overview of previous research on the topic using a minimum of 8 high quality sources. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P The student synthesized the literature and developed a coherent essay (not just a summary of the current literature). The student synthesized the literature and developed a coherent essay (not just a summary of the current literature). The student synthesized the literature and developed a coherent essay (not just a summary of the current literature). A+ A B+ B C+ N/P The student s article was succinct and well-organized. The student s article was succinct and well-organized. The student s article was succinct and well-organized. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P The review followed generally established APA guidelines. The review followed generally established APA guidelines. The review followed generally established APA guidelines. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P Overall, the article was interesting and thought provoking. Overall, the article was interesting and thought provoking. Overall, the article was interesting and thought provoking. A+ A B+ B C+ N/P Note: Must pass each category with a minimum of a C+ to receive credit for this assignment. Passing this assignment does not necessary mean that your dissertation topic has been approved. 200 ..A+ 195 .A 190 .B+ 185 .B 180 .C+ Letter Grade: Points: See example below (all requirements to this assignment should be submitted as one document): Liberty University School of Education1971 University Blvd. Lynchburg, VA 24502 January 11, 2014 P.N. Raychowdhury c/o Karen Murphy, Editorial Manager Journal of Mathematics and Science P.O. Box 842014 Richmond, VA 23284-2014. Dear Ms. Murphy, Attached is an original manuscript (as an electronic word file and PDF) entitled Women of Faith in Science: The Double Glass Ceiling  for consideration in your Special Issue on Science Reform in Virginia: Impact of VISTA for the Journal of Mathematics and Science. The article addresses challenges women of faith face while pursuing science. I have participated in VISTA and the manuscript meets all the journal s guidelines for submission including: originality; not previously published or considered for publication; length; and form. The MS-Word manuscript consists of seven pages double spaced, the body is 1431 words and the abstract is 132 words. Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, Kurt Y. Michael, Ph.D. Associate Professor(434) 592-3760 [email protected] Journal of Mathematics and Science: Collaborative Explorations Call for PapersSpecial Issue on *Science Reform in Virginia: Impact of VISTA*SUBMISSION DEADLINE: February 15, 2014 The Journal of Mathematics and Science: Collaborative Explorations is seeking manuscripts that explore the impact of the Virginia Initiative for Science Teaching and Achievement (VISTA) on inservice and preservice teachers, science coordinators, school divisions, higher education faculty, and K12 students. The history of educational reform at all levels surely shows that significant and long-lasting change is not easy. (VMSC, 2013, Bass article) Manuscripts can address but are not limited to any of the following: Insight into the programs (elementary, secondary, coordinators, and higher education) of VISTA, Successes and challenges encountered implementing problem-based learning, inquiry teaching, and nature of science in Virginia, Accomplishments and challenges in the classroom when implementing new teaching and learning strategies, Issues of implementing reform efforts such as VISTA within a school, school division, region, and/or across the state, Evidence of success for students and teachers, Ideas and practical help for leaders at all levels as Virginia endeavors to improve student learning of and appreciation for science, and Implications for lessons learned and policies. First authors must have participated in, or supported the design/implementation of, one of the VISTA programs. Manuscripts can be practical applications, literature reviews, theoretical, or policy oriented. For practical applications, the theoretical base, student responses, challenges faced, methods of research, research outcomes, and lessons learned should be thoroughly described. Submission Guidelines: The body of the paper should be preceded by an abstract, maximum 200 words. References to published literature should be cited in the text in the following manner: [1], and grouped together at the end of the paper in numerical order. Submission of a manuscript implies that the paper has not been published and is not being considered for publication elsewhere. Once a paper has been accepted for publication in this journal, the author is assumed to have transferred the copyright to the Virginia Mathematics and Science Coalition. There are no page charges for the journal. *Please review the journal and its guidelines as you prepare your manuscript. **http://www.vamsc.org/* Submit manuscripts (as a PDF and an electronic word file) by February 15, 2014 to: P.N. Raychowdhury c/o Karen Murphy, ([email protected]) or VCU Mathematics, P.O. Box 842014, Richmond, VA 23284-2014. Women of faith In science: the double glass ceiling [Note: This article is currently in press by the Journal of Mathematics and Science. The article was written in first person and non- APA to meet the requirements of the journal editor] K.Y. Michael, Ph.D. School of Education, Liberty University Lynchburg, VA 24502 [email protected] Abstract The majority of female pre-service elementary school teachers pursuing licensure are choosing English as their cognate rather than math or science. The reason females are not choosing science as their cognate maybe due to the fact that science has long been considered a masculine pursuit. To complicate the issue, pre-service female teachers of deep religious faith are further challenged to navigate the dichotomy of science and religion. As a result, women, and especially women of deep religious faith, are at risk of not participating in science. The author suggests that there is room in the science classroom for open dialogue with students regarding the distinction between science and religion. This dialogue may aid students, especially women of faith, gain a deeper understanding of the nature of science and encourage participation in science. Introduction As the father of a high school daughter who has expressed an interest in pursuing a degree in chemistry, I began to reflect on the challenges females face in the field of science. While exploring the history of women in science, Watts points out that gender assumptions have long kept women on the margins of science  and that the past has long tendrils into the present  [1]. It appears that these tendrils could still be affecting female students. For example, as a professor of education at a private evangelical Christian university, I noticed that the majority of female pre-service elementary school teachers pursuing licensure were choosing English as their cognate rather than math or science. In discussions with colleagues from other universities, a similar phenomenon had been observed. However, my situation appeared somewhat unique in that not only was the majority of my students female, but many had a deep religious faith. Watts touched on the issue of religion by pointing out that a woman s success or even willingness to try to succeed in the sciences were greatly influenced by where they came from: class, family, networks, and religion [1]. I began to wonder how female students of deep religious faith, regardless of religious affiliation, navigate science. It appeared that not only did young women of faith have to acclimate to a discipline that had long been considered a masculine  pursuit, but were further challenged to reconcile the dichotomy of science and religion [1]. The battle between science and religion is often played out in the media. For example, well-known scientist and biologist Richard Dawkins in an editorial to the Independent, a British national morning newspaper, decried his opposition to religion by stating, Even the bad achievements of scientists, the bombs and sonar-guided whaling vessels, work! The achievements of theologians don t do anything, don t affect anything, don t achieve anything, don t even mean anything  [2]. This type of rhetoric may cause people of faith to have a negative attitude toward science. In their case study, Roth and Alexander examined students taking physics at an all boy Christian boarding school and reported that the students felt that, Religion and science do not connect. . . . Physics offends my beliefs. . . . Science completely goes against what God created In science, I feel like I am drawn away from religion  [3]. The tension between science and religion is real among students. Understanding how students negotiate their religious beliefs with science must continue to be explored; however, the deeper issue of how females navigate the religious and gender bias imposed by science may prove to be more problematic. In a sense, women of faith are faced with a double glass ceiling. The Literature on Women of Faith in Science Though scarce, the literature does touch on the issue regarding women of faith in science. For example, Astley and Francis conducted a quantitative study exploring the relationship between attitudes toward religion and science among 187 female students attending a series of lectures at the North of England Institute for Christian Education study day. A negative correlation was found between science and religion among female students. The study provided evidence that the more religious the female student, the less positive her attitude towards science [4]. In a similar study, Levesque and Guillaume surveyed 375 female students enrolled in teacher education courses at one of California State University s campuses regarding issues of religion and science. Specifically the researchers were looking at the theory of evolution. It was found that female students with a strong belief in God, an exclusive view of salvation, and a literal reading of the Bible  were found more prone to reject the theory of evolution. The authors try to reconcile their finding by stating that religious faith need not be an obstacle to accepting the scientific theory of evolution.  The statement is problematic in the sense that the authors expectation is acceptance  of the theory rather than just understanding the theory [5]. In an ethnographic study, Brandt described the experience of Deborah, an American Indian woman, in an undergraduate biology program at a university in the southwestern United States. The study addressed the issues of language, power, and authority and how Deborah had to accept the game rules  of scientific discourse while negotiating her American Indian heritage with that of Eurocentric science [6]. In a conversation with her mother she expressed her frustration which was grounded in her Native American spiritual beliefs: Well, in our Navajo way of thinking, I was trying to tell my mother about the atom and molecules, and all this and she looked at me like I was crazy. And I m like, you know, this is what I m learning!  You have to go through so much explaining. Here s our body, the organ systems, the heart. Within our heart are tissues . . . [w]ithin that are cells and [t]here are molecules that make up the cells, and within that are the atoms.  It can t be seen! But that s our whole makeup! And she s looking at me like I m crazy, because our Navajo creation story is similar to Adam and Eve So I m trying to explain it! [6]. The above studies are not presented to debate the origin of life, but to demonstrate that there is a distinct population of females who hold deep religious views that sometimes contradict that of science. This form of double jeopardy may further discourage young women of faith from pursuing the sciences. Brandt points out those Eurocentric sciences put up artificial barriers excluding people of various cultures and religions from participation in the sciences by dismissing other ways of knowing; this may often cause confusion and anxiety within students [6]. Social Ramifications of the Issue Socially accepted ways in how we act, think, feel, and believe play an important part in finding self-identity and how a person fits into socially meaningful groups [6]. Changing one s identity to be able to participate in deposing groups may be too much to endure for some students. Furthermore, there are particular social stigmas attached with a particular way of speaking, acting, believing, or performing among peers. In his study of minority students involvement in high school science classroom, Brown argues that participation in scientific discourse carries considerable social risk especially among students in the minority who constantly have to negotiate their relationship with teachers, classmates, family, and community. This social process is marked by assimilation and resistance  [7]. In order to survive, students must have the ability to perceive the values and norms that govern acceptable behavior at each location or social setting [6] [8]. What is acceptable belief and discourse within a religious community may not be acceptable within the science classroom and vice versa. As a result, women, and especially women of deep religious faith, are at risk of not participating in science. Conclusion As a society, we cannot afford to allow any voices, regardless of culture, religious background, or gender, to be silenced in respect to scientific discourse. To hear these different voices, both the formal and informal power structures must be sensitive to the past bias that still inhibits women from pursuing science. Moreover, acknowledgment of the ongoing tension between religious and science fundamentalism  must be addressed [9]. I believe that there is room in the science classroom for open dialogue with students regarding the distinction between science and religion. Furthermore, as an educator, my experience has been that classroom discussion regarding science and religion has proven to be beneficial in helping students gain a deeper understanding of the nature of science. Simply, the nature of religion should not be taboo as a discussion topic. When handled in a respectful and professional manner, it can provoke deep thought and challenge students to see the limitations of both science and religion in how each answers a particular question. My hope is that all students and especially women of faith will become active participants in scientific discourse and active members within the scientific community. References [1] R. Watts, ?Whose Knowledge? Gender, Education, Science and History,  History of Education, 36(3) (2007) 283 302. [2] R. Dawkins, Letter to the Editor,  Independent, March 20, 1993. [3.] W.M. Roth and T. Alexander, The Interaction of Students Scientific and Religious Discourses: Two Case Studies, International Journal of Science Education, 19 (1997) 125 146. [4] J. Astley and L.J. Francis, Promoting Positive Attitudes towards Science and Religion among Sixth-form Pupils: Dealing with Scientism and Creationism,  British Journal of Religious Education, 32(3) (2010) 189 200. [5] P.J. Levesque and A.M. Guillaume, Teachers, Evolution, and Religion: No Resolution in Sight,  Review of Religious Research, 51(4) (2010) 349-365. [6] C.B. Brandt, Scientific Discourse in the Academy: A Case Study of an American Indian Undergraduate,  Science Education, 92(5) (2008) 825-847. [7] B.A. Brown, Discursive identity: Assimilation into the Culture of Science and its Implication for Minority Students,  Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 41(8) (2004) 810-834. [8] G.S. Aikenhead and O.J. Jegede, Cross-Cultural Science Education: A Cognitive Explanation of a Cultural Phenomenon,  Journal of Research in Science Teaching 36(3) (1999) 269-287. [9] F. Cho, The Limits of the Buddhist Embrace of Science. Commentary on Compassion, Ethics, and Neuroscience: Neuroethics through Buddhist Eyes, Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2012) 539 542.


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