The Mask of Emotions

The Mask of Emotions

For decades, analysts and advertisers have flooded our media with thousands of fascinatingly loose tactics held together by the fact that the American culture has evolved into dependence on material possessions to define who they are. Advertisements play mainly on the emotions of the targeted consumers. Depending on the product being peddled, advertisers try to mask reality and paint a picture in your head that ultimately leaves you with a feeling of emptiness that only their product can fill. There are literally thousands of outlets for product advertisement in today’s society. Along with the normal magazine ads and television commercials, advertisers also work to make sure that their product is seen in more subtle ways. If a big hit movie comes out, and the lead role is wearing the newest in throwback jerseys or is driving the latest car, the higher society spends freely to buy the newest and keep up with the times. Then, companies simply sit back and wait for the “trickle down effect” to kick in. Pretty soon the demand for the new product skyrockets, and the price can be raised. A perfect example of this was when the new James Bond movies started to come out. When the BMW Z3 roadster was cast as the newest Bond car, society’s collective mouths started watering. Within the next six months, BMW couldn’t make them fast enough to keep up with the demand. This need to have the latest and greatest parallels perfectly Laurence Shames’ essay “The More Factor.” In his essay, Shames describes the American economy as society’s last frontier. He illustrates that no matter how much we as a country may obtain, there will always be a demand for more (2). It has been said that it is the job of the rich to keep the poor people poor. After all, if there are no poor people, there can not be any rich people either. So it will be the upper class that is always looking for the next purchase that will set them apart fro…


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