The Maturation of Sentiment

The Maturation of Sentiment

The Maturation of Sentiment In “Everyday Use”, Ms. Johnson portrays her daughter Dee to be a shallow girl who wants nothing to do with her family’s past. Dee confirms this by becoming involved with the African-American Rights Movement and changing her name to Wangero, spiting a history of oppression. No matter how far someone distances themselves from their history, there is no escape from the longing to hold onto the past. As a child, after her house burned, Dee was devoid of remorse. “Why don’t you do a dance around the ashes?” her mother thought. (Walker 66) Even when she visited her mother and sister at their new house, there was “No doubt when Dee sees it she will want to tear it down.” (Walker 67) Yet as she captured photographs of her family, “She never takes a shot without making sure the house is included.” (Walker 67) She also brought her closest friend, Hakim, to share the experience after citing in a correspondence to her mother that she would never bring her friends to her family home. (Walker 67) This showed that not only had Dee matured physically and mentally, but also emotionally, and was proof that reasons for her visit were genuine. Upon entering the house for a meal, Dee “went on through the chitlins and corn bread, the greens, and everything else. She talked a blue streak over the sweet potatoes. Everything delighted her.” (Walker 68) Her soul had been incomplete for so long without the food of her past. She began to find herself anew after this wonderful feast and was ready to tackle the remainder of the tasks that she had returned home to complete. As she leapt from her seat, Dee crooned over pieces of her family’s past like a child in a candy store. “I knew there was something I wanted to ask you if I could have.” (Walker 69) She chose only handcrafted items, meticulously created with love by people she felt emotional connections with. This showed maturation…


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