The mechanics of a baseball swing

The mechanics of a baseball swing

The Baseball Swing The biomechanics of the baseball swing can be described four phases: Stance, Recoil, Swing, and Follow through. Previous studies have been completed on the biomechanics of a baseball swing in an effort to perfect the art of the perfect swing. First I am going to discuss the stance. It is important that the batter stand in a position that is most comfortable and allows for balance at all times. The player’s body weight should be slightly distributed on the back leg with the feet being about shoulder width apart. The hips and shoulders are kept level with the front hip, which is the left hip. It is important to maintain relaxation during this phase. The bat is held at about chest level, while the elbows are out and the wrist is hyper-extended. The muscles that hyperextend the wrists are the Extensor Carpi Radialis Longus, the Extensor Carpi Radialis Brevis, and the Extensor Carpi Ulnaris. The muscles that keep the shoulders flexed are the Pectoralis Major, Corocobrachilis, and the Anterior Deltoid. The Middle Deltoid and the Anterior Deltoid slightly abduct the shoulder in this phase. The Trapezius, Rhomboid Major, Rhomboid Minor, and the Levator Scapulae elevate the shoulders. The elbows are flexed at a 45-degree angle. The muscles that flex the elbows are the Flexor Carpi Radialus, the Flexor Carpi Ulnarus, the Pronator Teres, the Biceps Brachii, the Brachioradialis, and the Brachialis. Next, I am going to discuss the Recoil phase of the baseball swing. The initial motion of a baseball swing is known as the Recoil phase or Loading phase. The player’s body weight shifts toward the back leg, while simultaneously the motion of the upper body is moving in a clockwise or same side rotation above the trunk. This causes the trunk of the hitter to move away from the pitcher. The muscles that are involved in trunk rotation are the Internal Obliques and the External Obliques. This rotation is initi…


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