The Significance of Trifles

The Significance of Trifles

The Significance of Trifles Men are inclined to overlook trifles and look for the big picture of situations. Susan Glaspell illustrates this scheme in her play, Trifles, and her short story, “Story of an Hour.” The play is based on the short story. While trying to solve a murder case of a local friend, John Wright, the men go into his home to search for clues. The men involved in the case were Mr. Hale, Sheriff Peters, and the County Attorney. Mr. Hale and Sheriff Peters brought their wives along to the house in order to do some errands for Mrs. Wright, who was being held in the county jail for her husband’s murder. The men did not believe that the women could find any clues; therefore the clues found by the wives were useless on the trip to the men. The men only enjoyed the company of their wives. Men tend to overlook the significance of trifles and look at the big picture instead. The men who performed in Trifles had a tendency to ignore important places to look for the clues because they thought that the places were insignificant. They wanted to look at the places where the crimes were committed, and thought of the kitchen to be “nothing but kitchen things” (). They underestimated the importance of the “kitchen things” that Mrs. Wright had left behind. In the kitchen the wives found the broken preservatives, a symbol of how a person can only take so much coldness until he breaks. They also found the supporting evidence in the kitchen of the crime. As a result of Mrs. Wright having to leave her house without notice, she left her tasks unfinished and objects behind; therefore leaving behind evidence. The men were not thinking about the trifles that could become evidence and help solve the murder case. Mrs. Wright felt a sense of freedom after her husband’s murder. Before Mrs. Wright married John Wright, she was a happy person. Mrs. Hale said of Mrs. Wright, “She used to wear pretty clothes and b…


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