The story of an hour

The story of an hour

Imagery in “The Story of an Hour” Kate Chopin uses a great deal of imagery in “The Story of an Hour” to portray Mrs. Mallard’s feelings after her husband has passed away. Her sister Josephine was very cautious when telling Mrs. Mallard of the death of her husband, knowing about her heart troubles and in fear that Mrs. Mallard would be so devastated she might have a heart attack. Quite the opposite happens, Mrs. Mallard is exhilarated when she hears of her husband’s passing away. The first thing that is described when Mrs. Mallard enters the room alone after hearing about her husbands death is “an open window, and a comfortable, roomy armchair.” The open window represents freedom to the outside world, and the armchair shows that there is just enough room for her to be comfortable and not having to share it with anyone else. To show her relief, the story explains how when she sat down in this chair she “sank, pressed down by a physical exhaustion that haunted her body and seemed to reach into her soul.” The next paragraph describes the beauty of what she sees while looking out of that window. “The tops of trees that were all aquiver with the new spring life,” “the delicious breath of rain,” “notes of a distant song,” and “countless sparrows twittering.” It shows her looking forward to what life has to offer, enjoying its beauty. She appreciates the birds, enjoys the smell of life, she is happy. In describing her physical appearance the story tells that she was “young, with a fair, calm face, whose lines bespoke repression and even a certain strength.” She now had a dull stare in her eyes which “indicated a suspension of intelligent thought.” She was able to think for herself, not hold back her feelings or thoughts, she could live life the way she wants to, not the way someone else had wanted her to. “As powerless as her two white slender hands would ha…


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