The Sword and the Storm

The Sword and the Storm

The Sword and the Storm Analysis: Edward Rowland Sill’s “Opportunity” and Wendy Greiner Lefko’s “The Blessing of a Storm” are both different yet are uplifting, reflective poems that deals with a moral to grab the opportunity presented in every kind of situation and make readers look inside themselves and examine their principles. Edward Rowland Sill’s Opportuity depicts a battle scene that captures the essence of a true warrior. As the battle is raging with little hope of victory (“a prince’s banner wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes”), the weaker more cowardly men would relinquish their stand in face of the opposition and leave their comrades to die. Perhaps, they would even cry to the heavens that fate had denied them the upper hand against their superiors. The most honorable men like the prince instead make themselves aware of the situation, make the most out of the resources available and give all that they have “?to their very last breath– in fighting the battle. Transforming the “craven” soldier’s broken sword into a deadly weapon, the king’s son declares victory by “hewing his enemy”. But the weapon did not make the man, he gave it fearful power. Instead of naming it “The Blessing of a Storm” Lefko chooses to aptly call it “The Blessing of the Storm” so that readers can not just value past adversities but welcome future ones. As a “storm” shatters the persona’s inner defenses (“ship”), he found his strength in the power of prayer and humility. Letting go of his pride made his faith grew and he was able to experience God’s love in a different perspective. In the last three stanzas, the persona realizes that the trials God send people are trials within our human limitations and knowing that upcoming “storms” are all laden with the purpose of allowing him to grow and the opportunity to model Christ-like behavior, the persona decides that sailing against t…


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