The traditional notion of being smart and intelligent is to have a high IQ.

The traditional notion of being smart and intelligent is to have a high IQ.

The traditional notion of being smart and intelligent is to have a high IQ. In 1983, Dr. Howard Gardner challenged the accepted notion of being smart. He suggested that it was far too limited. Howard Gardner is a professor of education at Harvard University. He suggests that there 8 different types of smart, making the 8 multiple intelligences(Armstrong). Those multiple intelligences are linguistic intelligence, logical-mathematical intelligence, spatial intelligence, bodily-kinesthetic intelligence, musical intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, and naturalistic intelligence. Originally there were only seven, but later naturalistic intelligence was added. According to Dr. Thomas Armstrong the essence of this theory is being able to respect the differences among different people, appreciating all the ways that people can learn, looking at alternative modes of assessment, and individualizing approaches to instruction. Dr.Thomas Armstrong makes a great statement that says, “My work as an educator and psychologist in the fields of multiple intelligences, the myth of ADD/ADHD, and the natural genius of kids, has been guided by a belief that all children are gifted children. Each child comes into the world with unique potentials that, if properly nourished, can contribute to the battlement of our world. The biggest challenge for parents and teachers is to remove the roadblocks that keep those gifts from being recognized, celebrated, and nurtured”. This quote is truly an inspiration to parents, teachers, educators and anyone else that believes that the multiple intelligences are crucial in the learning process. There are many different multiple intelligence surveys with different questions, but they all have the same basic idea. There are 8 sections to this assessment and there is a list of things to check off as you go on to each one. In the end, you go back to each one and count up the numb…


Comments are closed.