William Blake and miseries in 18th century

William Blake and miseries in 18th century

From Songs of Innocence and Experience it could be said that Blake blames organised religion for the miseries of poverty, restriction and the exploitation of children, which 18th century society endured Blake immediately makes readers aware of the repression religion forces upon society in London, the capital of England that represents religion and the monarchy, people have become have become “mind forged manacles.” The way the church is described by Blake ensures that the reader feels the church is uncaring towards people in society. In the Little Vagabond the “church is cold” this image projects that the church doesn’t feel as it is spiritually dead. Blake reinforces the image of the church being dead again in London where the “bl’ckning church appalls,” the colour “black’ is used by Blake to illustrate the churches decay. The word “appalls” meanwhile suggests death. As a pathiest Blake believes in seeing nature through god, ” look on the rising sun! There god does live,” here Blake can see God. By writing in the age of the industrial revolution Blake is being pulled further away from God as pastoral landscapes are destroyed and replaced with by the “chartered street” and “the chartered Thames.” (London) Maybe this is why Blake losses faith in religion as he see the industrial revolution in a negative fashion. Blake feels Religion is responsible for supporting child exploitation, as religion does nothing to stop the children from ” being clothed in the “clothes of death” (exp The chimney sweeper) this imagery is brutal is showing the reality of child exploitation and likely result for the child, the reader cant help but be affected by its power. Blake shows the hypocrisy of religion, which is supposedly there to help people, but as the chimney sweep is being exploited the both parents “have gone to the church to pray”, this illustrates to the reader that the church doesn’…


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