Women’s Inequaltites in American Schools

Women’s Inequaltites in American Schools

Women’s Inequality in American Schools Inequality in the American schools and work place has been, and continues to be a serious problem. Despite the improvements in such equalities, males and females continue to experiences unfair gaps in certain aspects in life. While the equality among genders has developed over the past several years, there is some evidence to indicate that females continue to experience unequal treatment in the educational system suggesting that males remain in a superior status over women. A couple of centuries ago education was generally existent to the wealthy; many believed that working was more important than schooling the youth. However, in 1647, the Old Deluder Satan Act was enacted; this law required that every town provide education for the youth (Johnson & Dupuis, 2003, p.200). Later, compulsory education laws were passed within the following two centuries. According to Johnson and Dupuis (2003), compulsory education laws required school attendance on the theory that it is to the benefit of the state or commonwealth to educate all people. By 1900, the majority of the states required all children to attend school. Moreover, it was not until 1944, that the National Education Association (NEA) declared the following: “Schools should be dedicated to the proposition that every youth in these United States”?regardless of sex, economic status, geographic location, or race”?should experience a broad and balanced education: (Johnson & Dupuis 2003, p.207). The equality among males and females had finally reached a fair battleground, or so it seemed. Despite the educational requirements of children’s attendance that was passed through compulsory laws stated previously, high school and college level institutes were primarily opened to males only. “Girls did not attend because colleges at the time did not admit them” (Johnson & Dupuis, 2003, p.204). It was almost universally believed that a…


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