WOULD YOU PULL THE PLUG

WOULD YOU PULL THE PLUG

Would you pull the plug? Imagine your grandmother is in the hospital. She’s incapable of communicating to others and moves like a vegetable. Everyday you see her there is always a need of medical attention. You feel her pain and witnessed her suffering. Her symptoms are miraculous. All you remember is the last day that you seen her normal. Since her illness, your family now is starting more controversy than ever. No one can’t decide who will pay the hospital payments and her grandmother is need of a costly operation would only spare her life. You and family definitely can’t afford the operation. So, still you and your family are forced to give her medical attention 24 hours a day. What should you do? I would pull the plug in my opinion. There’s nothing worse than watching someone you loved suffer. This is an example of euthanasia as an act toward assistance suicide. This is an example of my grandmother, Shirley. Shirley was a lovely, kind-hearted, healthy individual whose life became a living nightmare after a stroke. I remember the last day she appeared normal like a walk in the park. She picked me up from my 8th grade basketball practice and she took me to her house. We chatted over some smoothing homemade lemon tea until my mother arrived. After she arrived, I gave my grandmother her last hug and kiss because during the night I received a phone call announcing she was in the hospital. But what happen? She bumped her head on the table and heads a stroke that night. She lost the right half of her brain. This meant she couldn’t communicate or move. She spent three years in and out the hospital because my family finances couldn’t meet hospital standards. St. Vincent cost 4,000 per month, and my father sold his house to convene with the hospital expenses. She had been under a condition where she needed attention every minute. My grandmother stayed two years straight in the hospital until my family couldn’t pay monthly fee…


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