YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN

YOUNG GOODMAN BROWN

In the effort to compare the short story by Nathaniel Hawthorne ” Young Goodman Brown” to Sigmund Feud’s theory of the mind, I would explain how some parts of the story show that Young Goodman Brown efforts to resists what was happening in the woods did not repress his idea of his fellow village members. Due to what he finds out in the woods Mr. Brown disassociates himself with his fellow man. While Young Goodman Brown is in the forest with the stranger he is trying to convince the stranger why he no longer wishes to continue on his errand. So he starts to give him reasons such as, “My father never went into the woods on such errands, nor his father before him.” This statement according to Freud’s theory represents resistance. Young Goodman Brown is trying to resist going on this errand, but the stranger informs him that he is good friends with his forefathers. He states ” they were my good friends, both; and many a pleasant walk have we had along this path, and returned merrily after midnight.” Upon hearing this Brown seems not wanting to believe the stranger, stating ” verily, I marvel not, seeing that the least rumor of the sort would have driven them from New England, we are people of prayer and of good works to boot and abide no such wickedness.” This statement shows that Brown is trying to repress the idea that his family could have done such thing. Also while walking through the forest Young Goodman Brown finds out that the very people he thought were so heavenly was not. Brown comes upon a ceremony which is setup like a altar. Brown starts to recognize the faces he sees in the service; they are the same faces that would be seen at the churches, at the board of province, he even sees the Deacon Gookin. When the ceremony begins the leader of the service state” evil is the nature of mankind; evil must be your only happiness. Welcome again, my children, to the communion of your race.” this statem…


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